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losing weight and mammogram changes

A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Devon Webster
21 years experience in Medical Oncology
Yes: Weight loss obviously causes your breasts to be smaller and less dense. Your mammograms will look different. Fat doesn't show up on a mammogram; it is ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wayne Ingram
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Xray density: If there has been a gain in weight, the breast will have more fatty tissue to "look through" with the mammogram. If a weight loss, there is sometimes ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Dang
13 years experience in Radiology
Depends: With the breasts being a fat storage site, a weight change may alter the mammographic density of the breast. This change may necessitate additional ev ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Aasim Sehbai
23 years experience in Hematology and Oncology
Weight: The breasts may have appeared more denser compared to previous mammogram.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Kirk
Dr. John Kirk answered
26 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
YES: In general, you should have an annual mammogram and clinical breast exam performed. The presence of menopause and estrogen exposure potentially incre ... Read More
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A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. Keita Sakon
25 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Calcium deposits: There are calcium depoists in breast tissue that could be benign or malignant and they look quite different. If the report said benign finding then i ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
46 years experience in Radiation Oncology
It means that: You have thin skin about your weight, and hate the "compresion" associated with mammograms - -do you really think the tech was being cruel and sadisti ... Read More
A 58-year-old female asked:
Dr. Douglas Bourgon
21 years experience in Radiology
Common at any age: The 'white' portion on a mammogram represents the glandular tissue in the breast. While it tends to decrease in percentage with age, every woman's ma ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Luis Gonzalez
38 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Family History: Ever changing guidelines for screening conditions can be confusing. Your family history and personal risk assessment is most important when deciding ... Read More
A 69-year-old female asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
Follow their advice.: Not sure what to make of that? Sounds like you need more tests such as an ultrasound or perhaps needle localization biopsy.

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