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How long does it take to get mouth cancer from chewing tobacco

A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joseph Woods
27 years experience Pathology
It varies, but long.: Tobacco use, including smokeless tobacco, is certainly a risk factor. Most patients present at over age 50. There may be few or no symptoms. Mouth ... Read More

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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
36 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Unknown: The risk of mouth cancer is increased with tobacco exposure: smoked or chewed. How long it takes is not easy to answer. The risk does diminish over ti ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Simon Rosenberg
45 years experience Dentistry
It varies wildly: Chewing tobacco induces cancer by direct contact & by dissolving cancer producing chemicals in the saliva that pools in the floor of the mouth under t ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
39 years experience Dentistry
Technically yes: The more you dip the greater are your chances.
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Benjamin
22 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Don't find out: You are referring to "gingival recession." here's some info from nci: http://dccps.Nci.Nih.Gov/tcrb/less_effects.Html the thought behind the questi ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Joseph Woods
27 years experience Pathology
It varies, but long.: Alcohol use and tobacco use are the main risk factors for oral cancer. Most are seen in patients over 50 years of age. Oral cavity lesions present a ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlos Encarnacion
34 years experience Medical Oncology
Good question: But the problem is nobody can answer for sure. I guess it would require exposure for a few years but remember that cancer is seldom a one hit deal, a ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kathryn Wagner
30 years experience General Surgery
Oral cancer/tobacco: No one knows for sure so quit chewing. The spitting part is yucky anyway.
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Ginsberg
36 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Not sure: Cancer development generally requires a "latent' period to develop. How long that is, is different for different people and different cancers. Best to ... Read More
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Variable time: Each person has different susceptibility to cancer and the time from exposure to tobacco to cancer is extremely variable. However, if you use tobacco ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Variable: It usually takes a number of years, but it is not worth trying your luck. Please stop using tobacco in any form, immediately as the risk of cancer is ... Read More
A male asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Usually years: You should quit using tobacco while you are ahead. If you quit now, you reduce the damage to your body and lessen your risk for getting cancer later. ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Usually years: It often takes years to develop oral cancer from chewing tobacco, however, there have been cases of teens developing oral cancer due to genetic suscep ... Read More
A 63-year-old male asked:
Dr. Neil Kudler
29 years experience Internal Medicine
About a day: Nicotine lasts for something north of two hours, but there are breakdown products that can still be measured in blood and urine for about a day. Howev ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Years: Most cancers take years to develop from the time of initial stimulus. You should note that damage to the tissue starts early, within days to months, ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
35 years experience Dentistry
Can't say: Can't give you a time. But now is. Good time to quit. See a dentist or oral surgeon for an oral cancer exam.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wayne Ingram
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Very quickly: Because smokeless tobacco is held between the cheek and gum it is absorbed very quickly into the blood stream in very high concentrations. It is the d ... Read More
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
39 years experience Dentistry
Doesn't matter: Length of time is irrelevent.. Smokeless tobacco contains cancer causing agents. Follow the below link for more detailed info: http://www.Cancer.Go ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
46 years experience Radiation Oncology
Not sure that: Any one has done the human experiment of snuff dose/time/exposure to discern minimal dose and time of a carcinogen to cause a potentially lethal event ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Quon
41 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Depends: I am unaware of any published studies that can quantify how long you have to chew tobacco before being diagnosed. Oral cancer from chewing tobacco ... Read More
A 23-year-old male asked:
Dr. Kenneth Crabb
45 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Not normally: Kissing will not transfer hpv, but oral sex can. It takes at least months and probably years for a cancer to develop. Most women < 30 years old w ... Read More
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90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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