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eye drooping and twitching

A 50-year-old female asked:
Dr. Derrick Lonsdale
72 years experience in Preventive Medicine
That could be : Serious. Get a medical opinion locally.
1
1 thank

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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Bradley
17 years experience in LASIK Surgery
Dry eye treatment: Your description sounds like dry eye. Initial treatment is frequent artificial tears during the day, ointment at night, warm compresses a few times a ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Leonard Pizzolatto
40 years experience in General Practice
Muscle spasm: Muscle twitching around the eyes is quite common. Most everyone has this occur to them at some point in their lives. It can be caused by stress, fatig ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Alan Jackson
29 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Need eye exam: You may want to try getting adequate rest and limit the stress factors in your life. It the symptoms still persist , see your eye doctor.
1
1 thank
A member asked:
Dr. Amin Ashrafzadeh
23 years experience in Ophthalmology
Irritation: The most common reason for twitching of the eyes, is local irritation such as dry eyes and allergies.
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1 comment
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10 thanks
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Djamchid Lotfi
57 years experience in Neurology
Stress?: anxiety and stress are by far the commonest cause
2
2 thanks
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Smith
53 years experience in Neurosurgery
Stress, fatigue etc: Commonest cause of eye twitching is stress, followed by fatigue, sleep deprivation, stimulant use (even simply coffee). Other conditions causing eye t ... Read More
13
13 thanks
A 33-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience in Pediatrics
Myokymia(if no tic): Random twitching of an eyelid or another small facial muscle, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quiveri ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Yale Kanter
60 years experience in Ophthalmology
Eye lid twitch: This is benign, but annoying at times and will usually resolve itself. It is often associated with fatigue, anxiety or tension. A refraction should ... Read More
6
6 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Sherris
32 years experience in Facial Plastic Surgery
Botox: Botox treatments are excellent for blepharospasm and may be covered by insurance.

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