A 43-year-old male asked:
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i am experiencing eye. twitching.

2 doctor answers
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Myokymia?: Random twitching of an eyelid or another small facial muscle, which happens in normal people, is called myokymia (an involuntary, spontaneous, quivering of a few muscle cell bundles within a muscle). Myokymia starts and stops spontaneously. It can last a few minutes to a few days. One should see a doctor if such symptoms persist, keep recurring, or are combined with any other symptoms.
Answered on Apr 4, 2017
Dr. Bert Liang
Specializes in Neurology
Blepharospasm: This is a condition called blepharospasm, which is thought to be due to a misfiring of certain types of neurons/muscles which control eye blinking (creating the twitching). Since the cause can be multifactorial, understanding a history and doing a physical exam is important to best address therapeutic options. Please see your doctor for further evaluation if it becomes bothersome.
Answered on Apr 4, 2017

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A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Amin Ashrafzadeh
23 years experience Ophthalmology
Likely irritation: Try some artificial tears. If it persists, see an ophthalmologist.

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