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dietary supplements adverse effects

A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
61 years experience Internal Medicine
Safety: More and more reports suggest that chronic use of ppi's are not safe. H2 blockers like zantac and pepcid are probably safer. Pepcid is probably the mo ... Read More

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A 25-year-old female asked:
Dr. Krishna Kumar
55 years experience Psychiatry
Lexapro (escitalopram) weight gain: I commend you for your desire to lose weight. Lexapro is for depression and anxiety, it can have side effects of weight gain, anxiety and depression. ... Read More
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Dr. Matt Wachsman
36 years experience Internal Medicine
The supplements: at best are worthless. There have been some reports of supplements laced with drugs. Weight loss drugs overlap with the effects of lexapro (escitalopr ... Read More
A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Stevan Cordas
57 years experience Internal Medicine
Adverse effects: When consumed in high enough amounts, for a long enough time, or in combination with certain other substances, all chemicals can be toxic, including n ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
46 years experience Pediatrics
Perhaps Serious: Depending upon the supplement, heart trouble, hypertension, strokes, and kidney trouble. Good diet should eliminate the need for dietary supplements i ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sergio Schabelman
48 years experience Cardiology
Triglicerides: Slow niacin is a medication and NOT a dietary supplement. It does improve lipid profile by diminishing triglycerides and improving HDL (good) cholest ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mary Ann Block
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Yes: The body's biochemical processes need vitamins & minerals to work properly. Much of our grocery store food no longer contains the same levels of nutri ... Read More
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1 thank
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Charlap
37 years experience Holistic Medicine
If deficient: If you have a known deficiency and can't address it with whole foods due to allergies or other problems then a specific supplement may be of value. Ot ... Read More
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mary Ann Block
A Verified Doctor answered
A US doctor answered Learn more
Yes: Unless they are eating all organic foods, most people need nutritional supplements. Our regular grocery store foods no longer contain the nutrients th ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kathleen Cullen
9 years experience Internal Medicine
In moderation: The best way to get your proper vitamins and minerals is to eat a well balanced diet loaded with raw fruits and veggies. I know this is not always eas ... Read More
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A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Milton Alvis, jr
41 years experience Preventive Medicine
Stuff People Ingest: By act of the us congress, dshea 1994, for anything sold as a "dietary supplement", the fda is not allowed to require the manufacturer/marketer/seller ... Read More

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