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causes of anemia and high urea nitrogen

A 67-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Creatinine level?: All laboratory results need to be interpreted in the clinical context and the doctor who ordered the tests is usually in the best position to do that. ... Read More

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A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
52 years experience Infectious Disease
Maybe yes...: ...but the answer depends on the numbers. Certainly these symptoms could go along with significantly abnormal kidney function, but it's the actual BUN ... Read More
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. E. Regina Widman
45 years experience Family Medicine
You have a uti: when a urinalysis shows large Leukocytes and nitrites positive you have a urinary tract infection and need antibiotics pending the culture report. On ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Lin
Dr. James Lin answered
50 years experience Urology
Here are some...: Blood urea nitrogen reflects extrinsic nitrogen intake and blood concentration. Hence, the common causes for mild elevated BUN are dehydration and hig ... Read More
A 39-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ipe Kalathoor
16 years experience Internal Medicine
Metabolic panel: Urea could be low without any significance, sometimes seen in liver failure malnourishment. There could be other rare causes. . Low bicarbonate (sodiu ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlo Contreras
17 years experience Surgical Oncology
Gout, dehydration.: Gout, dehydration, and renal failure are the most common causes.
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Luis Villaplana
34 years experience Internal Medicine
Protein: Protein in diet needs lowered in most renal patients.
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A 69-year-old female asked:
Dr. Todd Woltman
29 years experience General Surgery
Depends: 1 excess intake 2 hemochromatosis, a condition leading to accumulation of iron. Treated with medications and phlebotomy, or periodic removal of blood ... Read More
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A 92-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Kwok
32 years experience Pediatrics
Numbers are numbers: Lab results are numbers, and numbers are just numbers. They have little meaning without looking at the whole person. Low hemoglobin, hematocrit, and r ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bac Nguyen
22 years experience Family Medicine
So many causes: Genetic such as syndrome-x and trisomy syndrome; diseases such as renal failure, hypertension, acidosis, tumor-lysis syndrome, sarcoidosis, hypothyro ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Elden Rand
20 years experience Cardiology
Suspect hyperaldo: High blood pressure with low blood potassium levels brings the potential diagnosis of elevated aldosterone level (hyperaldosteronism) as a possibility ... Read More
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A female asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience Pathology
Homework?: This is more than we can handle in 400 words, you know reference ranges are set so several % of healthies fall outside, that all well-muscled men have ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Veeraish Chauhan
13 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Protein: Proteins are the main source of nitrogen in the diet.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Su Fairchild
23 years experience Integrative Medicine
No: Chronic myelogeneous leukemia, promyelocytic leukemia, polycythemia vera and also the hypereosinophilic syndrome can result in elevated levels of B12 ... Read More
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A 26-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Killian
27 years experience General Practice
Liver is in trouble: This sounds like too much alcohol. But, it could be infection or reaction to other medication or fatty deposits if the patient is obese. But, first wo ... Read More
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A 52-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gebrehana Zebro (formerly Woldegiorgis)
31 years experience Internal Medicine
Many causes: The main ones are diet , taking the above mentioned minerals as medication , kidney diseases ( for potassium ) hormonal problem ( hyperparathyroidism ... Read More
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A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Good kidneys: There is no need for concern due to low blood urea. as long as you are not emaciated or undernourished.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kalyani Perumal
28 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
INPUT-OUTPUT : High levels of potassium can occur due to increased intake of high potassium containing foods, nutritional supplements etc 2. Changes in acid base bal ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alok Agrawal
33 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Yes: High protein or very high protein diets can cuse BUN to increase.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Dugan
Specializes in Hematology
Iron deficiency: Anemia can be associated with an elevated platelet count, but many possibilities. If the changes are significant talk to your doc about more work up.
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gloria Shenkir
17 years experience Internal Medicine
No worries.: Lactic acid level is rarely checked, the doc that ordered it should be discussing your results with you, Lactic Acid is checked to evaluate oxygen use ... Read More
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A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Erin Robertson
18 years experience General Practice
Context = everything: Let's consider: how "high" are your platelets, and how "low" is your calcium? Teeny differences are usually considered OK. If your doc is worried abou ... Read More
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A 51-year-old male asked:
Dr. Raj Singh
Dr. Raj Singh answered
10 years experience Internal Medicine
Sepsis: High lactate levels can be from multiple causes. The most common is low blood pressure limiting blood supply to vital organs and tissues. This can be ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alok Agrawal
33 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Yes: High creatinine and BUN occur in poor kidney function. High potassium levels can occur when kidney function is poor because kidney cannot get rid of p ... Read More

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