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cancer can get tattoo

A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
46 years experience Radiation Oncology
No cancer risk: Hepatitis risk. I wouldn't. It's your body.

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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shahid Rafique
43 years experience Internal Medicine
No: But you are certainly making yourself to far more devastating conditions like hepatitis b, c and hiv.
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Contaminated needles: And dyes. Tattoos are not associated with cancer, but the process can transmit a number of infections if proper aseptic precautions are not used, e.G, ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Joy Jackson
18 years experience Family Medicine
I : I don't think there are any contraindications. However, you should check with your oncologist if you want to be 100% sure. All the best.
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A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. Addagada Rao
55 years experience General Surgery
Yes possible: Yes it is possible to get another new lesion and is the reason , need close observation after initial treatment
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sewa Legha
49 years experience Medical Oncology
Seek Dermatologist's: A good dermatologist can check your moles and advice you whether your moles are benign or suspected to be cancerous. More than 90% of the moles are be ... Read More
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Chad Levitt
21 years experience Radiation Oncology
Same as from sun: Damage to your skin causes your body to have to replace the damaged skin with new skin. Heavy ultraviolet rays from either the sun or tanning beds ca ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sewa Legha
49 years experience Medical Oncology
Yes but its rare: Chemicals of various kinds can be carcinogenic. Similarly chemotherapy drugs have a known small risk to cause secondary cancers. Two classes of Antica ... Read More
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mike Bowman
18 years experience ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Sun damage and Genes: There can be a family component to many cancers including skin cancers. This should not be taken lightly. Sun exposure is another large risk factor fo ... Read More
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Simon Kimm
15 years experience Urology
Exam and biopsy.: The appearance of, or a change in character of a suspicious looking mole or skin lesion is often the first presenting sign. After physical examination ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience Pathology
Absolutely not: It may give you some protection. I am sorry somebody told you something so dreadfully false.
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Pierrette Mimi Poinsett
37 years experience Pediatrics
No: HPV- human papilloma virus does not cause lung cancer. It is implicated in cervical, anal, penile and oral cancers.
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A 59-year-old member asked:
Dr. Morris Westfried
45 years experience Dermatology
Np: If you have keloids only in your earlobes, it should not be a problem. However if you have keloids on your trunk or arms, it is best not to tattoo the ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Ebner
17 years experience Dermatology
Skin Cancer: Ultraviolet (uv) rays found in natural sunlight and tanning beds can lead to skin cancer later in life. There are generally two types of uv light tha ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alfred Parkhill Hand
20 years experience Radiology
That depends: That depends on multiple variables like family history, genetics (brca gene), environment (cigarettes, alcohol), diet, etc. Please see this link ... Read More
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Hunter Handsfield
52 years experience Infectious Disease
Probably not: HPV causes several cancers (cervix, anus, genital skin, throat) but rarely others. A few lung cancers, especially in nonsmokers, have HPV DNA in tumor ... Read More
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A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Michael Hulse
26 years experience Gynecology
No: Cancer cannot be spread from a needle stick. Their are many other diseases like HIV and hepatitis that can be spread that way. You may want to get c ... Read More
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A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jerome Litt
70 years experience Dermatology
TATTOO REMOVAL: Many dermatologists can remove tattoos. Depends on where and how large. Lasers often work.
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlos Encarnacion
34 years experience Medical Oncology
If...: ...Detected early enough, as with most cancers. The problem is that ovarian cancer is usually spread by the time it's discovered and there is no good ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tarek Bardawil
21 years experience Gynecology
YES: It can cause nasopharyngeal cancer.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
43 years experience Pathology
They get cancer: Ferrets are especially prone to endocrine carcinomas (insulinomas, adrenal cancers) and malignant lymphomas. These aren't contagious to people.
A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
I do not believe so: Hickies are just a bruise of the skin, that should not cause cancer.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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