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18 lead ekg placement

A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jason Rubenstein
Cardiology 20 years experience
Yes: Yes, absolutely. Avr usually has inverted t-waves normally. If you invert left and right arm electrodes, avr becomes avl so now avl has inverted t w... Read More

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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Elden Rand
Cardiology 21 years experience
Standard: Most typical 5 leads are: right arm, left arm, right leg, left leg, v1 lead. For convenience, they are usually put on the torso. Put the arm leads b... Read More
Dr. Payam Mehranpour
Cardiology 23 years experience
Usual: White to the right arm, black to the left arm, red to the left leg, green to the right leg, usually the v lead is brown which goes to the precordial p... Read More
A 18-year-old male asked:
Dr. Sandeep Chandra
Cardiology 29 years experience
It can: It can affect certain type of information on the ekg - may not affect assessment of rhythm, hr and st segments.
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
Cardiology 51 years experience
Ecg : The ECG records the vector direction of the signals in the heart. As such the placement of the leads is crucial to the interpretation of the ECG patte... Read More
A 75-year-old female asked:
Dr. Kenneth Gibbs
Specializes in Cardiology
No definitive pathol: Most likely represents LVH which is thickened heart muscle. Had to say without seeing EKG. If concerned repeat EKG or get echocardiogram.
A 18-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ira Friedlander
Cardiac Electrophysiology 42 years experience
There can be a lot: of normal variability to the p-wave morphology in V1. More so in women. In general a biphasic or mostly upright p wave is usual. Certainly you could h... Read More
A 17-year-old male asked:
Dr. David Miller
Dr. David Milleranswered
Family Medicine 10 years experience
Depends: In some cases, a 3 or 5-lead ekg provides sufficient information. However, for a full picture of what the heart is doing, a 12-lead is the best. It t... Read More
A 17-year-old male asked:
Dr. Tony Ho
Dr. Tony Hoanswered
Infectious Disease 14 years experience
Depends: That is with life threatening hyperkalemia. If your case is mild, or chronic, it may not manifest yet with ekg abnormalities.
A 17-year-old male asked:
Dr. Charles Rocamboli
Family Medicine 18 years experience
Your 18: Your 18, so your probably fine unless there is reason to think there is something wrong. Do you have chest pain? Kidney problems? Why did you get an e... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. Mary Engrav
Dr. Mary Engravanswered
Emergency Medicine 31 years experience
A : A "nonspecific" abnormality means that the wave doesn't look like the typical, standard ekg. The st-t wave is the wave that occurs right after the qr... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
Cardiology 51 years experience
ECG: the ECG like most tests has false positives. Discuss with your doc, if indicated additional workup is possible

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