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A 34-year-old member asked:

i don't meet my recommended daily potassium and sodium intake. what problems can this create?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Jack Rubin
Nephrology and Dialysis 48 years experience
Intake of sodium : How do you know that your levels of sodium (s) and potassium (k) are low? Have low levels of them on a blood test? If not, you are ingesting enough of both. If you k is low, reasons for this may various kidney problems or a low magnesium level. If your s is low, it may be due to some edema formation, diuretics, hyperglycemia or other water retaining state. See a nephrologist for more information.

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Similar questions

A 39-year-old member asked:

I heard that you have to lower potassium level in order to lower your blood pressure. Is that true?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Mark Stern
Cardiology 46 years experience
No: No, for example ace inhibitors can both raise potassium and lower blood pressure.
A 41-year-old member asked:

Can there be a link between hypothyroidism and high potassium?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
Pediatric Endocrinology 21 years experience
No: Unless your high potassium is due to renal failure as some congenital kidney defects can be associated with thyroid problems.
A 47-year-old member asked:

Are salt levels and potassium levels in the blood related?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
Internal Medicine 50 years experience
Yes, and no.: Sodium and potassium are both positive elements that when combined with negative chloride molecules make salts that are both important parts of serum, and potassium in particular an important element in red blood cells (nb: sea water is very similar in composition to our blood). Abnormalities of potassium (hypo or hyperkalemia) or sodium (hypo/hypernatremia) are very distinct entities.
A 39-year-old member asked:

What are the acceptable potassium levels in a patient with chronic kidney disea?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gregory Hale
Specializes in Nephrology and Dialysis
3.5 to 5.0-5.5: Generally, the potassium should be kept within normal limits just as for a person without renal disease. Most labs have a normal range of 3.5 on the low end and may be anywhere from 5 to 5.5 on the high end. Potassium is less well eliminated by patients with kidney disease and generally with advanced kidney disease, the potassium intake must be reduced.
CA
A 25-year-old member asked:

What guidelines for potassium and sodium should I follow when cooking a dinner for someone on dialysis?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin Griffiths
Specializes in Nephrology and Dialysis
Keep it low: For a person on dialysis, they need to have a low potassium and low salt diet. Dialysis patients can not regulate potassium and salt very well, so they need to minimize these minerals in their diets. If they have too much dietary salt and potassium, cardic issues and and an elevated bood pressure can occur.

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Last updated Jul 24, 2013

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