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A 30-year-old male asked:

Does treating a patient who has acute hepatitis b with antivirals reduce the chance of it becoming chronic?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Al Hegab
Dr. Al Hegabanswered
Allergy and Immunology 40 years experience
Possibly: That what are some authorities are recommending, but it has to be under supervision by specialists and follow certain guidelines. The main goal is prevention of disease progression to cirrhosis or cancer, hopefully not, best wishes
Dr. Charles Turck
Pharmacology 17 years experience
No: Antivirals are rarely used in acute hep B because it hasn’t been shown to decrease the chance and the infection resolves on its own 95% of the time. If they’re used in acute hep B, it’s for those with symptoms of considerable liver damage to decrease amount of liver injury. When used in chronic hep B, the goal is similar: to reduce the risk of complications like cirrhosis.

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Last updated Feb 13, 2019

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