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Scranton, PA
A 28-year-old female asked:

I was prescribed bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) to treat e. coli bacteria found on vaginal culture. readings say that bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) is not effective to treat bv. am i wasting time?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Benjamin Green
Family Medicine 18 years experience
True, but...: For e.Coli infections (i.e. Bladder infections), Bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) can actually be quite effective. Bacterial vaginosis (bv) is actually a different type of vaginal infection caused by other bacteria (not e. Coli). For true bv, then Bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) would not be effective, but is sounds as if the e. Coli being treated in this case is not actually bv. If you are not improving, call or see your doctor.
Dr. Alvin Lin
Geriatrics 31 years experience
Maybe (not) . . .: Hmmm . . . Bv or bacterial vaginosis isn't caused by e coli nor is it treated by bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim). Best to go back to prescribing doctor for clarification & possible re-evaluation. Perhaps you were prescribed Bactrim (sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) for bladder infection (UTI) found on urine culture.
Dr. Michael Flax
Obstetrics and Gynecology 47 years experience
E coli can be a bowel contaminent. BV is caused by Gardnerella vaginalis, and is typically treated with Cleocin or Flagyl(metronidazole0
Mar 12, 2013

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