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A member asked:

When is it ok to give my baby juice?

9 doctor answers19 doctors weighed in
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics 23 years experience
Six months: Six months is when juice and water are generally started for infants. However, juice (which is mostly sugar and water) is not a necessary part of infant nutrition and most pediatricians (and dentists) would be quite fine with never giving it to infants.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 34 years experience
Only if needed: Juice can be given after age 6 months, if recommended by a doctor to help with some problem. For example, apple juice can help relieve constipation. Otherwise, normal healthy babies do not need juice. They can eat fruit, prepared appropriately for the age of the baby, once they are 6 months old.
Dr. Kevin Windisch
Pediatrics 26 years experience
After eating fruit: If your child has eaten the fruit then it is okay to drink the juice. Just remember that juice is junk food for babies. Juice is high in sugar and should be limited to 4 ounces daily.
Dr. Jeffrey Min
Specializes in Pediatrics
Rarely if ever: I am not a big fan of giving any juice to babies or children since most juices are just sugar and water. Babies should drink breast milk/formula until 6 months, then water can be added. I also discourage juice since once juice is given, some babies won't like their breast milk/formula/water as much. If you are going to give juice, i definitely recommend diluting it as much as possible.
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Pediatrics 36 years experience
No: Juice is the useless part of fruit. If it's homemade juice, you'd be better off dumping the juice and giving the baby pulp, that's where all the good stuff is.
Dr. Bert Mandelbaum
Pediatrics 25 years experience
No: Most healthy babies do not need juice. Occasionally pediatricians utilize juice as a laxative for babies with constipation. Most babies only need breast milk (ideally) or formula.
Dr. Roy Benaroch
Pediatrics 28 years experience
Yes: Yes, it's ok-- but it's not necessary, and it's really not a good idea. They get used to "the sweet stuff." water and formula (or milk when older) is all babies need to drink.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 34 years experience
No: Normal healthy babies do not need fruit juice nor vegetable juice. They drink breastmilk or formula; plus some solid foods after age 6 months. Fruits that are not sour can be mashed up or pureed and given. Vegetables can be cooked first and then mashed up or pureed. However, juice is sometimes given to treat constipation (such as 4 ounces of apple or prune juice each day for a few days).
Dr. Bryan Levey
Pediatrics 28 years experience
No: Juice is garbage. It's the fruit with most of the fiber and vitamins removed and the sugar left behind. Juice makes kids fat, creates a habit of always looking for something sweet when hungry or thirsty, and is a great way to establish a lousy diet at a young age. The people who believe juice is good nutrition are usually people trying to sell you juice.

Similar questions

PA
A 19-year-old female asked:

What age can you give babies juice?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. JUDY WASHINGTON
Family Medicine 39 years experience
Fruit Juice: It is recommended not to serve infants juices until they are after 8 months of age. It is not recommended to give orange juice. Juices should be given by cup and are not a substitute for milk. Strained fruits and vegetables are started at 6 to 8 months.

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Last updated Mar 1, 2019

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