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A 44-year-old member asked:

What should i do for poison ivy?

7 doctor answers16 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Zacharisen
Allergy and Immunology 34 years experience
Avoid: Poison ivy is a common form of allergic contact dermatitis to the oleoresin of rhus plants. Depending on location and severity of symptoms, mild to potent steroid ointments are usually sufficient. If symptoms are widespread or severe, Prednisone may be needed and tapered over 2-3 weeks. Oatmeal baths and zyrtec (cetirizine) may help. Ultimately best thing is to recognize these plants and avoid them.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 26 years experience
Poison Ivy: There are specific products that you can buy that will wash the urushiol off. Some options of treating poison ivy include calamine lotion, oatmeal soaks, Hydrocortisone cream and antihistamines. Anything which has touched urushiol from the poison ivy needs to be cleaned (clothes, shoes, gear etc.) oral steroids are sometimes indicated.
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
Family Medicine 32 years experience
Depends on stage: Treatment for contact to the poison ivy or poison oak plant depends on the stage of exposure. If the rash is present, a doctor can prescribe steroids and antihistamines. If the exposure is recent and pre-symptoms, washing with tecnu helps remove urushiol, the oil from the poison ivy and poison oak plants that cause the blisters, itching, and pain. See your doctor and don't rub your eyes!
Dr. Lee Perry
Allergy and Immunology 18 years experience
Avoidance is best: The best treatment for poison ivy is to avoid it all together...Once the rash develops, i would recommend antihistamines to control the itch. Also, if severe, you should see your doctor for a prescription of topical steroids.
Dr. Carlos Moe
23 years experience
See below: You can use a mixture of Benadryl (diphenhydramine) gel over the counter, mix it with Hydrocortisone cream and rub over the affected area this will help to clear up the rash associated with poison ivy.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 26 years experience
Options: There are specific products that you can buy that will wash the urushiol off. Some options of treating poison ivy include calamine lotion, oatmeal soaks, Hydrocortisone cream and antihistamines.
Dr. Andrew Murphy
Allergy and Immunology 30 years experience
Steroids: Poison ivy is a contact dermatitis. Once one has been exposed and develops the rash then treatment options include topical steroids and it the rash is severe enough then a course of oral steroids may be considered. Oral antihistamines may be helpful for the itchiness of the rash.

Similar questions

Clinton, IA
A 30-year-old male asked:

How to dry out poison ivy?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Coyle Connolly
Dermatology 30 years experience
Poison ivy : Calamine lotion will help with the itch and help to dry the rash. Prescription corticosteroid cream or pills may be needed for more widespread poison ivy.
A 32-year-old member asked:

Tips for poison ivy?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. John Chiu
Allergy and Immunology 58 years experience
See doctor: If the problem is a mild one, time will heal it. If the problem is severe, you will need to see a doctor who may prescribe some Prednisone pills or a cortisone injection for you. In the meanwhile, try apply some otc Hydrocortisone cream 3 to 4 times daily.
A 47-year-old member asked:

What should I use to put on poison ivy?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. John Chiu
Allergy and Immunology 58 years experience
See doctor: If the problem is a mild one, time will heal it. A topical cortisone cream may also be helpful. If the problem is severe, you will need to see a doctor who may prescribe some Prednisone pills or a cortisone injection for you.
Alexandria, LA
A female asked about a 19-year-old male:

How do you know when you have poison ivy ?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Fisher
Dermatology 33 years experience
Poison Ivy: The most common symptoms of the rash (allergic contact dermatitis ) from poison ivy, oak, or sumac are: itching. Red streaks or general redness where the plant brushed against the skin. Small bumps or larger raised areas (hives). Blisters filled with fluid that may leak out. In rare cases, some people develop blood-filled blisters that can turn black and become shiny dark spots.
A 43-year-old member asked:

What are the stages of poison ivy?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Duane Gels
Allergy and Immunology 38 years experience
Bad to worse: Most people develop allergic contact dermatitis to the waxy oil of urushiol that makes up much of the plant resin. It is a delayed-type hypersensitivity that can vary somewhat based on the type/degree of exposure and how allergic the patient is. Over time, lesions can go from dry and red, to bumpy, to huge water blisters (bullae) before they crust over and clear up. The lesions are not contagious.

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Last updated Aug 13, 2018

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