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A 24-year-old member asked:

How could alcoholic liver disease have led to a brain bleed?

5 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Roger Frankel
Neurosurgery 30 years experience
Clotting disorder: Alcoholic liver disease is associated with inadequate clotting factors in the blood. If the blood cannot clot properly, bleeding episodes can be much more severe.
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Dr. Stuart Wasser
Addiction Medicine 36 years experience
Absolutely: If your liver disease is severe enough, you are more likely to bleed in multiple ways including into the brain.
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Dr. Estrada Bernard
Neurosurgery 39 years experience
Impaired clotting: If liver disease is severe enough, it will affect the normal clotting function and lead to an increased risk of bleeding into the brain and other organs. Other issues may be in play in the context of alcoholism. These would include nutritional status, hypertension and platelet (blood clotting cells) function.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. John Fung
General Surgery 40 years experience
Also consider trauma: In addition for patients with advanced liver disease due to alcohol abuse to have clotting problems, alcoholism with repeated head traumas, such as falls, has also been associated as a risk factor for acute-on-chronic subdural hematomas (acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma: not uncommon events. J korean neurosurg soc. 2011 dec;50(6):512-6).
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Dr. Jon Krook
General Surgery 25 years experience
Thin blood: If your liver is really bad, the factors that help stop bleeding get low. What would be minor trauma can turn into major trauma in those that are coagulopathic (thin blood) from either illness or acquired from certain medications. Head trauma is deadly in those who have dysfunctional clotting systems.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated Mar 1, 2016

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