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A 25-year-old member asked:

could a posterior cruciate ligament (pcl) heal itself over time?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joel McClurg
Specializes in Orthopedic Surgery
Usually not: Pcl injuries, if complete, have zero healing potential. In partial injuries (sprains) depending on your age and other factors healing is possible.
Dr. James Chen
Sports Medicine 15 years experience
Yes: The majority of people with PCL tears do not have surgery. There are three grades of PCL tears 1, 2, 3. The general rule is that surgery can improve your grade by one notch. Thus if you are a grade 1 or 2, then surgery probably not needed. If you are not super active and do not have symptoms then surgery not needed. Good rehab focusing on quad strength will go a long way in this injury.

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CA
A 37-year-old member asked:

What diffuses the tear of the anterior cruciate ligament with posterior displacement within the intercondylar?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vlad Gendelman
Orthopedic Surgery 17 years experience
Nothing: There is nothing that would "diffuse" a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (acl). Acl is one of only few ligaments in our body that is entirely intra-articular which means it is not within soft tissues but is sitting inside the joint space with some surrounding joint fluid. This atmosphere makes it impossible for the ACL to heal (which I am assuming what you meant by diffuse).
A 52-year-old member asked:

How should I treat a torn ligament?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Tandy Freeman
Orthopedic Surgery 37 years experience
With expert guidance: Appropriate treatment of a torn ligament depends a variety of factors including which ligament is injured, how badly it is injured, what other structures are injured, what the functional demands of the patient are, how much instability the injury causes, how old the patient is, what other medical problems the patient has, etc., and is best determined in consultation with qualified physician.
A 41-year-old member asked:

What are lax ligaments?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Thomas Deberardino
Orthopedic Surgery 32 years experience
Synonymous w/ loose: Lax is short for laxity. Lax ligaments are describing ligaments that are loose and have increased laxity. There is a spectrum of laxity that is normal within all joints. Some people are looser or tighter than others. If one has no symptoms or limitations, no treatment or remedy is warranted. If pain or instability is present, the increased laxity is said to be abnormal (pathologic or patholaxity).
CA
A 37-year-old member asked:

Can you tell me the difference between a damaged tendon and a damaged ligament?

3 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Aileen Shieu
Hand Surgery 20 years experience
Yes: The tendons move your fingers and wrists. If it is damaged, you may lose the ability to bend or straighten the affected part. Ligaments support your joints, holding bones together. If that is damaged, you may have swelling to the region and instability to the joint. This means that it may hurt when you move the joint, or that it will move improperly.
CA
A 24-year-old member asked:

Can you use an X-ray to diagnose a PCL tear to see if you need reconstruction?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Ayres
Orthopedic Surgery 37 years experience
No: You can't see the PCL on an x-ray, but if the tibia (shin bone) is subluxed posteriorly on the lateral view, it suggests that the knee is unstable posteriorly and it might be because the PCL is torn. An MRI is a better than an x-ray to evaluate the pcl. Most PCL injuries can be managed nonoperatively with therapy. If you have done rehab and are still unstable, then consider surgery.

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Last updated Dec 20, 2018
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