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A 32-year-old member asked:

What kind of doctor if i have a rotator cuff problem?

3 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Allen Lu
Dr. Allen Luanswered
Orthopedic Surgery 24 years experience
Orthopedic sports: In general, an orthopedic surgeon or sports medicine physician focuses on problems with the rotator cuff. If there is a tear that needs surgery, the orthopedic surgeon performs that surgery. Some shoulder and sports medicine surgeons focus on shoulder problems as well. However, in general, your primary care provider can often address the problem completely.
Dr. Shawn Hennigan
Orthopedic Surgery 27 years experience
Orthopedic surgeon: There is very good data supporting the cost effectiveness of specialty care. I recommend consulting with an orthopedic surgeon specializing in shoulder surgery.
Dr. Robert Coats II
Orthopedic Surgery 23 years experience
Orthopaedic surgeon: Orthopaedic surgeons care for the musculoskeletal system. Disorders of muscle, tendon, ligament, nerve, bone and joints involve the musculoskeletal system. The rotator cuff is a tendon and problems can cause shoulder pain, stiffness and weakness. See a board certified orthopaedic surgeon for evaluation and treatment.

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A 45-year-old member asked:

Which type of doctor should I see for a rotator cuff problem?

4 doctor answers15 doctors weighed in
Dr. Charles Toman
Sports Medicine 18 years experience
Sports medicine or : Shoulder specialist.
A 41-year-old member asked:

How can the doctor tell if I have an internal rotator cuff problem or an external rotator cuff problem?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Robert Coats II
Orthopedic Surgery 23 years experience
Exam, x-ray & MRI: An external rotator cuff problem would be shoulder impingement. The rotator cuff is pinched by the bony structure of the shoulder, causing inflammation of the bursa and rotator cuff tendon. An internal rotator cuff problem would be a tear of the cuff itself. Physical exam may reveal weakness associated with a rotator cuff tear, confirms by mri. Pain only with exam is more likely to be impingement.

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Last updated Feb 13, 2019
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