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A 33-year-old member asked:

how long can you live with ovarian cancer?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Devon Webster
Medical Oncology 22 years experience
It depends: Ovarian cancer that is caught early enough can be cured with surgery and you can live a normal life. Ovarian cancer that can't be cured can be treated repeatedly. Many women live for years with ovarian cancer with intermittent treatment, but each case is different. This is something you should ask your oncologist to be very honest about.
Dr. Paul Nowicki
Gynecologic Oncology 24 years experience
It depends on : The stage and type of ovarian cancer. Patient's overall fitness also plays a role as far how much chemotherapy and for how long they can receive it if the cancer recurrs.

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A 21-year-old member asked:

How can I reduce my risk for ovarian cancer?

3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barbara A Majeroni
Specializes in Family Medicine
Don't smoke: Many of the risk factors for ovarian cancer can't be changed- such as family history, early onset of menses, late menses, and no pregnancies. Enviromnental risk factors include smoking and obesity.
A 21-year-old member asked:

How is ovarian cancer diagnosed?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Thompson
Hematology and Oncology 20 years experience
Biopsy: (see similar question/answer). Most (all?) cancers need a biopsy to be definitively diagnosed. Tests such as imaging (eg, pelvic ultrasound) or laboratory tests (eg, ca-125) may be suspicious for ovarian cancer, but a biopsy and pathology study needs to be done.
A 21-year-old member asked:

Who is at risk for ovarian cancer?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Banks Hinshaw
Obstetrics and Gynecology 43 years experience
Increased risk...: ...is associated with increased age, women with a family history of ovarian or breast cancer, women with the genetic BRCA modifications, and certain ethnicities. These groups have a higher risk than the overall lifetime risk for women in the US of 1.6%.
A 21-year-old member asked:

What tests can diagnose ovarian cancer?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Thompson
Hematology and Oncology 20 years experience
Biopsy: While imaging (eg, pelvic ultrasound) or laboratory tests (eg, ca-125) may be suspicious for ovarian cancer, only a biopsy can definitively diagnosis ovarian cancer.
A female asked:

I have stage 4 ovarian cancer. I"ve gone off treatment. How long will I live?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Wayne Ingram
Specializes in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Not long: There is no specific amount of days or weeks for survival, however Stage 4 indicates that the Ovarian Cancer has metastasized (spread) to distant parts of your body .I wish you Godspeed as going off treatment is a very difficult decision to make for anyone in this condition.

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Last updated Nov 7, 2019

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