A 24-year-old member asked:
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what does it mean to have an accessory spleen?

3 doctor answers
Dr. Jon Krook
Dr. Jon Krook answered
24 years experience General Surgery
You are normal: 20-30% of the population have accessory spleens. They are normal. You are just lucky to have extra organs!
Answered on Nov 6, 2013
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1 thank
Dr. Matt Malkin
16 years experience Anesthesiology
Second spleen: Many people have a second spleen that shares the same function. This can be good in cases of spleen damage, or bad if spleen removal is necessary to treat low platelet count. Without a spleen, other parts of the body pick up some of the slack.
Answered on Jun 6, 2016
2
2 thanks
Dr. Mark Pack
Dr. Mark Pack answered
31 years experience General Surgery
Separate spleen tiss: An accessory spleen is usually a very small piece of spleen, often totally separate from the main spleen. It usually means nothing.
Answered on Oct 12, 2017

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Related questions:

A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
44 years experience Pathology
No: Maybe 25% of healthy folks have an accessory spleen or even a few of them.
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Anne Larson
34 years experience Hepatology
Other way around: There can be "accessory" spleens. This just means that when a person was developing, an extra spleen developed. They are not dangerous and don't cau ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
44 years experience Pathology
Usually TB or histo: These are usually walled-off infections. Here in Kansas City, it's really common to have these thanks to the histoplasmosis.
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1 thank
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ed Friedlander
44 years experience Pathology
Lucky you: It's quite common to have a mini-spleen in the hilum of your big one. It's of no concern.

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