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A 47-year-old member asked:

What can i do about an eye floater?

4 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. T Jeff Russell
Ophthalmology 35 years experience
Vitreous Floaters: A vitreous floater is due to fibers in the vitreous that coalesce and create al shadow that moves across your vision. If they have been present for awhile then just wait until they gradually move out of your vision. If they are new and/or associated with flashing lights (photopsia) then they could be associated with a retinal tear which could lead to a retinal detachment requiring an eye exam.
Dr. Michael Ham
Ophthalmology 27 years experience
Floaters: Most common it is recommended to have an immediate exam when they first occur to rule out retinal detachment. Wait a year and if they are still symptomatic then consider a vitrectomy to remove the vitreous and floaters. Most cases the floaters and blurriness will clear. Pvd is typically the cause of a retinal detachment, but the chance is about 1 in 5000.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Vitreous debris: The back of the eye is filled with a gel/fluid termed the vitreous. This is generally clear, holds things in place and can absorb most of the shocks the eye receives. Occasionally a discontinuity in this material or a bit of benign membranous debris, travels into the visual axis where it is seen as a spot termed a floater. If this is sudden occurring with light flashes etc. it needs evaluation.
Dr. Richard Hector
Ophthalmology 9 years experience
Liquefied vitreous: The gel (vitreous) that fills in side of you eye liquefies, usually in our 50/60's, but can occur earlier in eyes that are near sighted or after an injury. New floaters warrant an exam to rule out a retinal detachment or hemorrhage

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Similar questions

A 46-year-old member asked:

What are eye floaters?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Debris in back of ey: Floaters are debris, usually from eye renewal or condensations of the vitreous gel which fills the back of the eye. If they are located in the axis of vision, they may be seen in certain circumstances as floating objects in space like flying insects. If they appear suddenly or there are many or you have light flashes associated, then see your ophthalmologist immediately.
United Kingdom
A 45-year-old member asked:

What to do if you have floaters in your eye?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Philip Rosenblum
Family Medicine 28 years experience
See an eye doctor: Most oftentimes, floaters are a benign condition, that is, not concerning or dangerous. However, there are several serious, treatable conditions to be ruled out, including a detatched or torn retina inflammatory conditions or infection, vasculitis, or even lymphoma. See an ophthalmologist to evaluate you and rule out these conditions in order to avoid permanent damage to your vision.
A 21-year-old male asked:

How do you live with eye floaters?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bruce Saran
Ophthalmology 33 years experience
Time: Most symptoms from floaters will diminish to a tolerable level with time. Patients will notice them in certain lighting situations or activities. Vitrectomy surgery markedly increases the risk of cataract formation and the small but real risk of retinal tear and detachment. Surgery is only indicated if floaters are severely diminishing your ability to perform activities of daily living.
Sacramento, CA
A 52-year-old female asked:

I have a floater in my eye, what causes those?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nancy Webb
A Verified Doctoranswered
A US doctor answeredLearn more
Vitreous aging: Floaters are due to more dense areas in the vitreous humor, a gelatinous substance in the eye behind the lens and anterior to the retina. These changes can occur as an age related phenomenon. Sometimes floaters can be associated with retinal abnormalities. Go and get a dilated eye exam.
Dr. Bernard Godley
Retinal Surgery 32 years experience
If floaters are new or if they are associated with flashing lights, best to see an ophthalmologist within 48 hours for a dilated exam. These symptoms may indicate damage to retina.
Sep 1, 2013
A 48-year-old member asked:

Is there any treatment for a floater in my eye?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Tal Raviv
Ophthalmology 26 years experience
No: Floaters are caused by particles floating in the vitreous (jelly of the eye) casting a shadow on the retina. With time they usually settle to the bottom of the eye and out of the vision. New onset floaters should be examined by an opthalmologist asap to rule out retinal tear, hole, detachment.

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Last updated Sep 13, 2015

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