A 46-year-old member asked:
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what is the best way to stop enuresis?

5 doctor answers
Dr. Brittany Chan
9 years experience Pediatrics
Depends: Enuresis can be normal in a child younger than 5. If older than 5, your child should see a doctor to rule out medical causes such as diabetes or bladder dysfunction. If medical causes are ruled out, most cases will resolve on their own. Limiting drinks before bedtime or using bedwetting alarms may help. As a last resort, there are some prescription medications that may help as well.
Answered on Apr 15, 2015
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1 comment
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Dr. George Klauber
Specializes in Pediatric Urology
Enuresis alarm is best opportunity for a "cure" after Dr. Kimms simple measures have been tried.
Feb 7, 2013
Dr. Brittany Chan
9 years experience Pediatrics
Depends: Enuresis can be normal in a child younger than 5. If older than 5, your child should see a doctor to rule out medical causes such as diabetes or bladder dysfunction. If medical causes are ruled out, most cases will resolve on their own. Limiting drinks before bedtime or using bedwetting alarms may help. As a last resort, there are some prescription medications that may help as well.
Answered on Jul 2, 2015
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4 thanks
Dr. Carla Enriquez
49 years experience Pediatrics
Depends: Enuresis is relatively common. Most people outgrow it by 13 yrs old. Time is the safest treatment. Medications sometimes are helpful. There are several choices. Ddavp (desmopressin) is helpful, as is tofranil (imipramine). Fluid restriction and use of alarm blankets can be helpful as well. Check with your doctor for the option that is best for you.
Answered on Jun 25, 2014
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1 comment
Dr. George Klauber
Specializes in Pediatric Urology
Most effective treatment is to use an enuresis alarm. However, parents may have to check in or wake child if alarm goes off and bedwetter fails to wake up. Principal of alarm is that subject eventually sense the alarm will go off if their brain has ignored signals of bladder fullness which virtually always preced bedwetting.
Feb 7, 2013
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Enuresis: Find the cause and treat it. Symptomatic treatments include DDAVP which affects antidiuretic hormone, as tablet or nasal spray.
Answered on Jun 25, 2014
Dr. John Chavez
36 years experience Clinical Psychology
End enuresis: The method I have used successfully with my patients is as follows: 1. No liquids after 6:00 P.M. 2. Be sure child urinates before going to bed 3. Wake child up at 2:00 am and check if there has been bed wetting. If there is betting before this time on several occasions move time to 1:00 am 4. Be sure child urinates when you wake them. 5. Positive reinforcement 6. Possible combo of DDAVP (desmopressin) or othe.
Answered on Jun 25, 2014
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2 thanks

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Bedwetting alarm: Proven in numerous respected studies. However, need to be used correctly. 1) child must agree to use of alarm, 2) pep talk, like a sport's coach at be ... Read More
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