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A 48-year-old member asked:

What's neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 53 years experience
TOS: Thoracic outlet may affect nerves in the brachial plexus, or the veins and arteries passing from the neck into the chest wall. If the problem spares the blood vessels, and affects the nerves only, causing pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, then the classification describes "neurogenic" tos. This is by far the most common presentation, and can be confirmed by sophisticated EMG testing.
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Dr. Laurence Badgley
General Practice 54 years experience
Nerve symptoms: Tos caused by nerve ; artery impingement as pass through costoclavicular dimension between clavicle (collar bone) ; top first rib; space about one centimeter in life. When joints ; muscles of shoulder girdle injured, space prematurely closes with arm raising. Nerve symptoms are tingling ; numbness pinky side of hand ; forearm. Artery symptoms of hand coolness ; ischemia. Nerve symptoms dramatic.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

Similar questions

A 21-year-old member asked:

What is thoracic outlet syndrome?

3 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Cooke
Thoracic Surgery 23 years experience
Narrowing of space: Thoracic outlet syndrome is narrowng of the space between the first rib and the anterior scalene muscle. The axillary vein and artery and brachial plexus nerve passes through this space. Narowing the space can pinch the artery, vein, nerve or all of the above. Also, a rare, abnormal cervical rib can cause the same problems.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Laurence Badgley
General Practice 54 years experience
It seems to me that shoulder, clavicle, elevation via superior trapezius contraction is dynamically superior to scalene contraction & elevation of the first rib; which I have been led to believe is a theoretical construct; perhaps explaining the poor outcomes of scalene release. Is there clinical/anatomical evidence for scalenus anticus syndrome?
Jul 7, 2015
A 39-year-old member asked:

Can thoracic outlet syndrome be cured?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vasudev Ananthram
Cardiology 33 years experience
Usually yes: Yes, usully with surgery in severe symptomatic cases.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
A 42-year-old member asked:

Whats thoracic outlet syndrome?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bennett Machanic
Neurology 53 years experience
TOS: Tos involves the lower portion of the brachial plexus, where nerves from the neck pass through a tunnel into the chest on the way to the arm. The plexus can get trapped in the outlet area, and this event can cause pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, but can also affect blood vessels. On occasion, a congenital first rib can cause compression but trauma may also promote tos.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Dr. Gabriel Goren
A Verified Doctor commented
A US doctor answered Learn more
an other reason for TOS is scalenus anticus syndrome a muscle that will pull the first rib up and against the collar bone compressing nerves of the brachial plexus, axillary vein and artery...
Sep 16, 2013
Dr. Laurence Badgley
General Practice 54 years experience
It seems to me that shoulder, clavicle, elevation via superior trapezius contraction is dynamically superior to scalene contraction & elevation of the first rib; which I have been led to believe is a theoretical construct; perhaps explaining the poor outcomes of scalene release. Is there clinical/anatomical evidence for scalenus anticus syndrome?
Jul 7, 2015
A 30-year-old member asked:

How can I treat thoracic outlet syndrome?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Pankaj Kulshrestha
Thoracic Surgery 40 years experience
Thoracic outlet: Physiotherapy initially surgery if symptoms continue.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Blacksburg, VA
A 21-year-old male asked:

Is thoracic outlet syndrome permanent?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Peter Kubitz
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 21 years experience
Not necessarily.: Assuming that is correct diagnosis, this can commonly be helped with physical therapy. There may be necessity to consider surgical intervention for refractory symptoms, yet that surgery is commonly successful. This is a difficult diagnosis, to come to, so I would make sure you are comfortable with how you came to this diagnosis, and if not consider another opinion.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.

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Last updated Jan 13, 2019

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