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A 48-year-old member asked:

my friend has a hemochromatosis? what is that?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology 49 years experience
Excess iron: Some people have a hereditary condition leading to excessive iron accumulation in the body. Excess iron is toxic. It is easily treatable. See this site for more info. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hemochromatosis/basics/definition/con-20023606

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A 21-year-old member asked:

Why doesn't anyone know anything about hereditary hemochromatosis (hh) if it is so common? I feel all alone.

3 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gregg Albers
Addiction Medicine 41 years experience
Hemachromatosis: Quite a bit is known about the disease, but those who have it often do not find out about the disease or that they have the disease until they have some damage. It is also a disease that cannot be cured, but can be controlled for most people though monitoring with tests, and blood (iron) removal.
A 36-year-old member asked:

Is hemochromatosis considered dominant or considered recessive?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jason Hemming
Gastroenterology 17 years experience
Recessive (sort of): The common genetic defect in the hfe gene for phenotypic hemochromatosis is the c282y/c282y homozygous. However other defects other than c282y can lead to hemochromatosis. C282y heterozgyotes with hhc are though to posses another unclassified defect.
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 44 years experience
Excellent answer. If you have a single dose and really overdo your iron intake, you can get sick.
Jul 13, 2013
A 32-year-old member asked:

Is it possible that hemochromatosis could kill patients?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Maritza Baez
Family Medicine 17 years experience
Yes: Over time, excesses of iron build up in major organs such as the heart, liver, pancreas, joints and pituitary. If the extra iron is not removed, these organs can become diseased, causing conditions like diabetes mellitus, irregular heart beat or heart attack, arthritis, cirrhosis of the liver or liver cancer, gall bladder disease, depression, impotence, infertility, hypothyroidism, hypogonadism.
A 49-year-old member asked:

Help docs! my friend has a hemochromatosis?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Ed Friedlander
Pathology 44 years experience
Glad it's diagnosed: Of all the common, dread diseases, this one is the easiest to manage. I'm going to assume this is primary hemochromatosis not secondary to transfusion for some other lifetime illness. Your friend will be treated with regular phlebotomy and will start feeling a whole lot better in a short time.
A 35-year-old member asked:

What do you suggest if my friend has a hemochromatosis?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Pathology 49 years experience
Blood letting: Hemochromatosis can be easily managed by periodic removal of blood to drain the body of excess iron. This is about the only disease where the old practice of blood letting actually works.

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Last updated Nov 28, 2014
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