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A 21-year-old member asked:

what causes middle ear infection?

2 doctor answers10 doctors weighed in
Dr. Michael Olds
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 32 years experience
Bacterial and viral : Ear infections are more common in children due to their anatomy and predisposition for upper respiratory infections. When the eustachian tube fails to maintain a neutral pressure relative to the outside world, the middle ear can accumulate fluid, siphon bacteria from the upper respiratory tract into the middle ear and an infection results. Eustachian tube swelling is often initiated with a virus.
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics 46 years experience
Sequential event: This is the result of several things happening over a period of time. First, natural mucous from the walls inside the middle ear become trapped by a eustachian or drainage tube that has become blocked. Then normal throat or mouth germs get into the mucous & begin to multiply in great numbers due to the availability of nutrients.As the numbers increase, pain & fever often begin.

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A member asked:

Do colds lead to ear infections in children?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics 23 years experience
Yes: Colds tend to precede the onset of an ear infection in children. This is because a cold causes fluid to develop in the middle ear, that at times may get infected by bacteria or viruses. Ways to decrease your baby's risk of ear infections are: 1) avoid smoke exposure, 2) try to limit pacifier use in those prone to ear infections, and 3) avoid having your baby drink milk laying down flat.
A 37-year-old member asked:

Is vibramycin (doxycycline) effective for respiratory infections?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Joel Gallant
Infectious Disease 36 years experience
Generally not: Most respiratory infections are caused by viruses and should not be treated with antibiotics. Vibramycin (doxycycline) will treat some bacterial infections.
A 53-year-old female asked:

I suffer with chrohns and I have a colostomy and the skin around the stoma burns so bad that it brings tears to my eyes. Do you have any suggestions?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. David Wishnew
Wound care 42 years experience
Peristomal wound: When i see a patient who has difficulties with peristomal wound or pain, i generally try to ascertain cause. Usually, if there is no underlying pathology, the skin is irritated by the adhesive. Using a hydrocolloid dressing beneath the adhesive may reduce the difficulties.
A member asked:

Thick nasal mucus - I have to blow my nose very hard to get the plug feeling out, it is commonly very thick, white (not clear). Should I be concern?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Jeffrey Pollard
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 21 years experience
Thick nasal mucus: Thick nasal mucus can be related to sinusitis, but not necessarily. If you have chronic allergies or recurrent infections you should consult a doctor who can identify if there is an opportunity to improve nasal inflammation with sprays or treat infection with antibiotics. You may benefit from good nasal hygiene as well which involves using salt water rinses to clear mucus and allergens.
A 25-year-old member asked:

Can bronchitis and an upper respiratory tract infection elevate liver function?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Nela Cordero
Pediatrics 54 years experience
AURI: Auri is respiratory tract infection and bronchitis, elevation of liver enzymes and functions involve the GI tract or system.

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Last updated Sep 28, 2016
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