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what are immunizations?

4 doctor answers
Dr. Roy Benaroch
27 years experience Pediatrics
Help for immunity: We have a great immune system to fight infections, but our "army" can battle the enemy much more effectively if we've seen the enemy before, so we can recognize the bad guys and attack them as soon as possible. Immunizations are a way to preparing the immune system to better attack infecting enemies, so we can naturally fight off infections before getting sick.
Answered on Oct 11, 2013
3
3 thanks
Dr. Lisa Roberts
23 years experience Pediatrics
They prevent disease: Immunizations are one of modern medicine's greatest discoveries. They work by tricking the body's immune system to think it has been exposed to an illness in order to produce "antibodies" that help to prevent that individual from ever getting sick from that same disease. They are designed to prevent life-threatening diseases. Some vaccines (hepatitis b, hpv) are even designed to prevent cancer.
Answered on Nov 19, 2014
8
8 thanks
Dr. Mark Diamond
46 years experience Pediatrics
Promote Prevention: Material that safely is taken into the body and prime the body's immune system, so that when attacked by an infection, the body is able to fight off the infection is a definition of immunization. This material can be given by injection, orally or through nasal spray. All told immunizations have saved millions of lives and prevented many more cases . Probably the single biggest medical advance ever.
Answered on Dec 11, 2013
2
2 thanks
Dr. Yash Khanna
57 years experience Family Medicine
Protect Inf Disease: Immunizations are the best way to protect all humans and also animals against certain infectious diseases.They are called vaccinations or vaccines and these can be given by injection or by mouth.They also prevent the spread of diseases and prevent epidemics Over the years these have been successful in wiping out certain deadly diseases like Polio And Small Pox
Answered on Jul 31, 2015

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A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
46 years experience Pediatrics
They are....: If otherwise up to date, a Meningococcal vaccine and a tetanus-pertussis booster are given twice between 11 and 16-18.An hpv series should be started ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ankush Bansal
17 years experience Internal Medicine
Be specific: Usually injections can cause brief localized pain and redness but this goes away within 24 hours. Anything more specific than that, you need to tell ... Read More
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alireza Raboubi
15 years experience Family Medicine
CDC: go to the CDC website for a complete chart. http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/hcp/child-adolescent.html
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
46 years experience Pediatrics
May Need...: If otherwise up to date, a Meningococcal vaccine and a tetanus-pertussis booster are given twice between 11 and 16-18.An hpv series should be started ... Read More

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