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A 23-year-old member asked:

what is cervical dysplasia?

4 doctor answers14 doctors weighed in
Dr. Bac Nguyen
Family Medicine 23 years experience
Definition/causes: Cervical dysplasia = abnormal changes in the cells on the surface of the cervix that are seen underneath a microscope. Causes: most are due to the human papilloma viruses (hpv). Other risks = giving birth before age 16, smoking, immune difficiency, multiple sexual partners, and having sex before age 18 etc.. Increase your risk of cervical dysplasia.. Consult your doc... Good luck..
Dr. CESAR HOLGADO
Obstetrics and Gynecology 39 years experience
HPV: Cervical dysplasia is caused by the virus hpv. This just means that there is a cytologic change from a normal cell to something that needs to be closely monitored.
Dr. Megan Bird
Obstetrics and Gynecology 19 years experience
Abnormal cells: This is complicated so stay with me. Hpv is a virus that can infect cells on the cervix. When hpv gets into the cell it can cause the cell to make abnormal proteins. This makes the cell look different under the microscope. If the infection progresses, the cells can become cancerous. This is rare but dysplasia should be addressed. It can go away on its own in some cases. Others need treatment.
Dr. Diane Minich
Family Medicine 37 years experience
Precancerous cells: These are abnormal cells in the cervix that have a potential to turn into cancer but are not yet a cancer.

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CA
A 46-year-old member asked:

Could cervical dysplasia ever be cured?

2 doctor answers9 doctors weighed in
Dr. Kevin O'neil
Urogynecology 28 years experience
Yes: There are a number of treatment options for cervical dysplasia including cryotherapy, laser therapy, and excisional therapies. Some can be done in the doctor's office and some are done as outpatient surgeries. Which one is best depends on the degree of dysplasia, your age, whether you've completed child-bearing etc.
CA
A 34-year-old member asked:

How is cervical dysplasia typically treated?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Anne Rodriguez
Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 years experience
Several methods: Cervical dysplasia can be treated by a cone biopsy or leep procedure (in which a small portion of the cervix is removed), or sometimes by laser or cryotherapy(freezing), both of which destroy the abnormal cells but do not remove the area for further examination. There is good evidence that the hpv vaccines can decrease the risk of developing dysplasia in the first place.
India
A 23-year-old member asked:

What are the causes of cervical dysplasia?

3 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeff Livingston
Obstetrics and Gynecology 22 years experience
HPV: The overwhelming majority of cervical dyplasia is caused by hpv (human papilloma virus). Hpv is a virus transmitted sexually. Most cases of hpv will resolve on their own but some cases will persist and lead to precancerous (dysplasia) changes in the cervix. Some cases of cervical dysplasia can progress to cervical cancer so proper follow up with your doctor is key.
CA
A 35-year-old member asked:

What are the symptoms of cervical dysplasia?

3 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jeff Livingston
Obstetrics and Gynecology 22 years experience
No symptoms: There are no symptoms that go along with cervical dysplasia/abnormal pap smears leading to precancerous cells of the cervix. This is why having an annual pap smear done is so important. It allows early precancerous changes in the cervix to be diagnosed and treated. Hpv vaccination is recommended for all men and women between 9-26 years old to prevent this problem.
A 30-year-old member asked:

Whats cervical dysplasia mean?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Miguel Cano
Obstetrics and Gynecology 30 years experience
Precancerous cells: Dysplasia of the cervix are cells which are showing cellular changes consistent with pre-cancerous lesions. They are graded as low-grade (atypia or cin-1) or high-grade (cin 2, 3, or carcinoma in situ). Low grade cells can be followed while high grade lesions need to be identified (colposcopy) & removed (leep or cone biopsy).

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Last updated Aug 21, 2015

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