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A 41-year-old member asked:

What are the survival rates for breast cancer?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Sewa Legha
Medical Oncology 50 years experience
Excellent!: One of the best. More than 90% of women with breast cancer, treated properly will live for >5 years
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Psychiatry 25 years experience
5 year survival rate: According to the american cancer society the 5 year relative survival rate for stage1 is 100%, stage ii- 93%, stage iii is 72% and stage IV is 22%.

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Similar questions

A 38-year-old member asked:

What are the triple positive breast cancer survival rates?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Uma Swamy
Radiation Oncology 16 years experience
Depends: Other factors such as stage can contribute to survival rates. Please discuss this with your doctor in context of all the other factors that can contribute to survival rates here is a good review of breast cancer http://www.Cancer.Net/cancer-types/breast-cancer.
A 49-year-old member asked:

At 82 and having breast cancer what are my odds of survival?

2 doctor answers4 doctors weighed in
Dr. Alan Patterson
Obstetrics and Gynecology 42 years experience
Please ask your doc: Am sorry to hear that but it depends what stage and type the breast cancer is and what your over health is, please call your doc as your doc should be able to give u odds based on all that information that your doc knows.
A 37-year-old member asked:

What is the breast cancer survival rate?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Rosen
General Surgery 34 years experience
It Varies: 5-year breast cancer survival rates are dependent upon the cancer stage, varying from almost 100% for dcis (stage 0) to less than 20% for metastatic disease (stage 4). Furthermore, cancer survival is dependent upon the response to chemotherapy. Of note, breast cancer survival has increased over the past decade in the us.
A 39-year-old member asked:

What is positive breast cancer survival rate?

1 doctor answer1 doctor weighed in
Dr. Carlos Encarnacion
Medical Oncology 35 years experience
?: Positive for what? You mean estrogen receptor positive? Her-2 positive? Lymph node positive??? Can't help you here, friend. Not enough information.
A 30-year-old member asked:

What is the average survival rate for breast cancer?

2 doctor answers7 doctors weighed in
Dr. Barry Rosen
General Surgery 34 years experience
Depends on Stage,etc: Breast cancers vary a lot from one person to the next. Features that help predict how aggressive any cancer is include it's size, the presence of spread to adj.Lymph nodes or distant organs, specific proteins that are found on some cancers (estrogen-, progesterone-, her2/neu receptors), the grade of the tumor, the type of breast cancer, etc. In general, when caught early, we have high cure rates.

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Last updated Jun 29, 2019
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