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A 40-year-old member asked:

Can you get brain damage from lack of oxygen from snoring?

2 doctor answers6 doctors weighed in
Dr. Edward Smith
Neurosurgery 54 years experience
2 different events: Snoring results from vibration emitted from the upper airways, for instance a sides of the nostrils moving toward the septum during inhalation or more likely from vibration of the soft palate, uvula & perhaps tongue. Snoring is a noise. Its cause is airway obstruction. Severe obstruction blocks oxygen getting into the lung, hence possible brain injury--consider having polysomnogram test.
Dr. Robert Knox
ENT and Head and Neck Surgery 37 years experience
Snoring Brain Damage: Generally, even excessive snoring will not cause "brain damage". However, if oxygen levels drop during sleep, and this can come from snoring when breathing stops, a condition call sleep apnea, brain function may be affected. Memory loss, feeling "foggy", and irritability may all be associated with poor sleep quality from severe snoring, with sleep apnea. Go see your doctor - request a sleep study.

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A 32-year-old member asked:

Can you get brain damage from lack of oxygen fainting?

2 doctor answers5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Edward Smith
Neurosurgery 54 years experience
Yes: The human brain can withstand at most 4 minutes of oxygen deprivation before experiencing brain damage. Damage may be irreversible at this time but the brainstem is more resistant, hence the occurrence of "persistent vegetative state". But a simple faint can result from only a few seconds of oxygen deprivation without causing long-term damage.
A 36-year-old member asked:

What are we doing in brain damage by lack of oxygen?

1 doctor answer3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jefferson Chen
Neurosurgery 34 years experience
Hypoxia/anoxia: A lack or deficit of oxygen to the brain can occur for a variety of reasons. The term for this is hypoxia. Complete lack of oxygen is referred to as anoxia and is more severe. The neurons are particularly sensitive to this lack of oxygen and will die. This then results in the brain damage. In the most severe cirucumstances, this can lead to death of the patient.

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Last updated Jun 22, 2016

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