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Queensbury, NY
A 32-year-old female asked:

Sleep study showed arousal 36 times per hour. treated for ptsd with remeron (mirtazapine) and prozasin. should i be on stimulant during the day for hypersomnia?

2 doctor answers3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Donald Jacobson
A Verified Doctoranswered
41 years experience
Can't tell with info: Unfortunately, the number of arousals does not correlate with the degree of sleepiness. Arousals are not the same as awakenings. Therefore with the information you've given me i cannot tell you whether you should be on any type of medication for hypersomnolence. That is something that you will have to discuss with your sleep physician. Best wishes.
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Dr. Donald Jacobson
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If you have hypersomnia and no apnea, then a trial on a stimulant may be quite beneficial for your PTSD, mood, and level of alertness during the day. As long as you are not bipolar, another option would be Nuvigil, but in my experience Adderall works well in such situations.
Oct 24, 2013
Dr. Donald Jacobson
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I recommend you contact your family doc re the BP and then report the family doc's recommendation to your psychiatrist. Unfortunately I am only allowed to give generic answers here. Never suddenly fully stop a BP medication because you could get rebound hypertension. Sometimes lowering Remeron increases sedation and raising the dose decreases sedation. Much trial and error is involved.
Oct 24, 2013
Dr. Donald Jacobson
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You mentioned that your doctor doesn't listen to you. One time that could hurt your feelings, the next time it could cost your life. Ponder carefully.
Oct 24, 2013
Dr. Parham Gharagozlou
Sleep Medicine 10 years experience
NO NO: Need to find cause for arousals. Talk to sleep doctor. Ent and psychiatrist may be helpful as well.
Created for people with ongoing healthcare needs but benefits everyone.
Last updated Oct 24, 2013

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