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white blobs in stool

A 45-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Luntz
28 years experience Urology
Stool: It is likely mucus possible due to inflammation of the colon or rectum. You should see a colorectal surgeon for further evaluation..
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A 22-year-old male asked:
Dr. Rebecca Gliksman
37 years experience Internal Medicine
Yogurt-like blob BM: May be mucus. or other breakdown product. For constipation would drink 2.5-3.5 liters/day, eat 1 cup lentils ,barley brown rice, oats a day. f/u w/doc
A 59-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Do not worry: It is not an abnormality. Wish you good health! - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, milk and milk products, nuts, beans, leg ... Read More
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A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Natalie Hodge
25 years experience Pediatrics
Mucous Only: If your son has this isolated episode of passing mucous with no other symptoms, then I would not pursue it. If he has any abdominal pain, any blood w ... Read More
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A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Rochester
25 years experience Family Medicine
Mucous in stool: Not normal, Best to see doctor and have this check out. Could be several things but without exam and tests not much to help you at this point.
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A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Arthur Heller
42 years experience Gastroenterology
Nah: Significant blood loss (more than 3-4 ounces of blood), especially from upper sources, e.g. Stomach, duodenum , small bowel, less likely from right c ... Read More
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A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Charles Saha
27 years experience Gastroenterology
Stool change: Go to your doctor to have the stool analyzed for ova and parasites, occult blood, and culture and sensitivity.
A 39-year-old male asked:
Dr.
Dr. answered
Specializes in
Blood: Seems more likely. Perhaps from a haemorrhoid although there may be other possibilities (fissure, diverticular disease etc). Could be food as some w ... Read More
A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Bloody stools: You need to go and see a GI doctor asap. Bleeding from the colon can be due to cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, a variety of infectious agents an ... Read More
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A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jonah Essers
17 years experience Pediatric Gastroenterology
Testing: Time for your doctor to see you. You need blood and stool testing to determine if this is infection or chronic inflammatory disease. You may also need ... Read More
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A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
Melenic specks?: Dark-colored stools may result from iron supplements, foods you eat (like a lot of spinach), substances (like peptobismol), but most significantly sug ... Read More
A 32-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ahmad Ibrahim
18 years experience Urgent Care
Need exam: The best answer will require pictures and examination of your stool. In our practice it is not uncommon to send the stool for examination of parasites ... Read More
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A 24-year-old female asked:
Dr. Philip Miller
46 years experience Family Medicine
Exam: please consult your physician for a complete exam and stool analysis.
A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Thomas Heston
28 years experience Family Medicine
Diet: Sounds like something in your diet. Are you having any abdominal pain or discomfort? Are your bowel habits changing? If yes or for any other concerns, ... Read More
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A 57-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bernard Seif
39 years experience Clinical Psychology
Please see your: Doc right away. He/she will diagnose the type of bleeding and help you. Peace and good health.
A 25-year-old male asked:
Dr. Natalie Hodge
25 years experience Pediatrics
Yes : Yes, it can.
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
Good question, but..: Blood in stool is a warning sign. Brisk bleeding warrants emergency care. Causes of bleeding may be predictable (e.G anorectal trauma), but evaluation ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pamela Pappas
41 years experience Psychiatry
Hard to know: Without knowing what you've been eating, it's impossible to say. The easiest way to tell if you have blood in your stool is to do a stool test for oc ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
You're bleeding: Gi bleeding can be without warning, brisk, & originate anywhere in the gut (from esophagus, stomach, to rectum. Don't hesitate to seek urgent evaluati ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Yepuri
19 years experience Gastroenterology
Byproduct: Of normal digestive processes. Unlikely to represent any pathologic process but if other associated symptoms would seek evaluation.
A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
32 years experience Neurology
Probably hemorrhoids: You probably have hemorrhoids which is not life threatening. If you are not convinced then, you will need to see your physician.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Yes it can be.: But is stool is black, sticky and foul smelling that please seek evaluation.
A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Vahe Yetimyan
50 years experience General Practice
Colitis: You have some sort of colitis possibly inflammatory bowel disease. See your doctor
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A 50-year-old male asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
Sometimes...: Black spotting may result from iron supplements, foods you eat (like a lot of spinach), substances (like peptobismol), but most significantly suggests ... Read More
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