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What is the difference between an impingement and tear of a rotator cuff

A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Ayres
36 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Severity of condtion: With impingment, the rotator cuff is being pinched, without necessarily being torn, between the acromion of the shoulder blade and the top of the hume ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Brian Chimenti
26 years experience Sports Medicine
RC: Impingement implies a pinching of the rotator cuff generally underneath the bone called the acromion. This is often associated with either a bone spur ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vivek Agrawal
30 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Shoulder Specialist: Extrinsic impingement or the idea that a bone spur wears the rotator cuff away is currently thought to not be accurate. Learn more about this topic h ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Galland
31 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Rotator Cuff: In most cases it's very difficult to tell the difference between the two, however significant loss of function (i.e. Strength) is one good way to dete ... Read More
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jimmy Bowen
33 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Shoulder injury: A slap lesion refers to an injury to the labrum. A rotator cuff injury is to one of the 4 tendon or muscles that help move the shoulder.
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bernard Bach Jr
41 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Yes.: A shoulder sprain refers to a stretch or bruise to the ligaments that hold the shoulder together. A rotator cuff tear refers to a muscle that has been ... Read More
A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Marc Tressler
Specializes in Orthopedic Surgery
Semantics: I've treated lots of rotator cuffs over the years and never used that description, but i would assume this is someone trying to describe the location ... Read More
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A 50-year-old female asked:
Dr. David Trettin
32 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Yes: 'slap' tears are labral( cartilage) tears that occur anterior ( in the front of) and posterior ( in the back of), the long head of the biceps tendon i ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
They are different: Sometimes called chronic tendinitis, which inflamation of the tendons, prtial tear there a gap in the tendon.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Tepper
24 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Different parts: An acromioplasty is when bone on the acromion, which is above the rotator cuff, is shaved down. This is typically done if there is a large bone spur ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Amir Khan
Dr. Amir Khan answered
26 years experience Sports Medicine
See below: Impingement refers to the concept that the rotator cuff is getting pinched between the ball and a bone called the acromion (part of the shoulder girdl ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stephen Daquino
20 years experience Sports Medicine
Different structures: The ucl is the ligament holding the bones together on the inside of the elbow while the medial epicondyle is where the muscles attach at the inside of ... Read More
A 61-year-old female asked:
Dr. Mark Galland
31 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Graded 1 through 3..: Sprains & strains are graded based on the # of fibers w/in the structure that are stretched/ torn. This is by no means an exact # of fibers, but a gra ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jason Boyer
17 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Partial vs full tear: A sprain is a partial tear of a ligament, sometimes only microscopically. A tearusually refers to a complete disruption of the fibers that make up th ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Allen Lu
Dr. Allen Lu answered
23 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Different structures: A ligament attaches between bones, and produces stability. Examples are acls and ankle ligaments. So a ligament tear produces instability. A muscle pu ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Sider
38 years experience Sports Medicine
See below: A separated shoulder is really a sprain of the AC (acromioclavicular ) joint. They are graded from 1 to 3 with 1 taking a few weeks to heal and 3 taki ... Read More
A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Frank Holmes
22 years experience Sports Medicine
Ligament/cartilage: A knee sprain is a stretch or tear of a ligament. A ligament connects a bone to a bone. 4 major ligaments of the knee- ACL, PCL, MCL, PCL. The meniscu ... Read More
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A 54-year-old male asked:
Dr. Michael Gabor
32 years experience Diagnostic Radiology
Either test might: be appropriate. However, shoulder ultrasound is highly operator dependent and may be less readily available than MRI in some areas.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Aruna Seneviratne
25 years experience Sports Medicine
Ones a ligament: The acl is an importan ligament (ligaments connect bone to bone), that restrains anterior or forward translation of the tibia. The patellar tendon is ... Read More
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A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Arthur Mandelin
19 years experience Rheumatology
Injured vs Inflamed: A shoulder strain is any minor temporary damage to any shoulder structure, usually by overuse or injury and commonly called a "pulled shoulder." tend ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Job Timeny
12 years experience Podiatry
Tendinosis vs. tendi: Tendinosis is at more adcanced stage. It means that the tendon starts to lose its integrity, even starts to tear off. Tendinitis means inflammation o ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mehul Desai
18 years experience Pain Management
Different: Sprains affect ligaments and connective tissue strains affect muscles.
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