Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

treating pudendal nerve pain with stimulator

A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. John Berryman
53 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Abdominal pain: The pain described should be accurately diagnosed prior to consideration of a "pudendal block". This kind of pain may be originating in the colon or v ... Read More
1
1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Todd Swick
46 years experience Sleep Medicine
Nerve to genitals: This is a nerve that carries sensory information from the genital area to the brain and is part of the ability to urinate.
3
3 thanks
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. Romanth Waghmarae
38 years experience Pain Management
Pudendal Nerve: Not really as it supplies the perineum, anal region.
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Harry Dollahite
Specializes in Orthopedic Surgery
Yes it should: The pudendal nerve is a peripheral nerve enervating the perineal region. Contusion to this nerve can occur with a bicycle seat, horseback riding, or s ... Read More
A 40-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Uyeda
44 years experience General Surgery
Not likely: There are several anatomical planes between the two structures.
A 79-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ralph Boling
38 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Yes it can: be reached and pinched.
A 45-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ronald Cirillo
Specializes in Gastroenterology
Yes: Plus a host of infections can occur.
2
2 thanks
A 70-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gregory Lewis
43 years experience Urology
Very unlikely: Pudendal nerve blocks are generally quite safe. Potential adverse effects are uncommon but may include pain at the injection site, bleeding, infection ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 63-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
60 years experience Internal Medicine
Pudendal nerve: Pudendal nerve entrapment may cause pain on sitting, urinary and/or fecal incontinence. In males it may cause penile numbness or scrotum. A neurologis ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 22-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ralph Boling
38 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Possible: Injections can help vulvodynia, trial of injection with short acting agents can be useful to test idea.

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month