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tagamet and maalox

A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
Yes: Yes it is.

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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Zandman
13 years experience Gastroenterology
No: There is no evidence that maalox causes c. Diff. Antibiotics are associated with the development of c. Diff.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
Not quite: However, they are very close to being identical.
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A 51-year-old male asked:
Dr. Lynne Weixel
35 years experience Clinical Psychology
Probably: There are no reported serious interactions, but you always should inform your provider of all medications and supplements that you take. It should be ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Zantac (ranitidine): Nope, but it will calm your stomach down.
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. You Sung Sang
30 years experience Gastroenterology
Yes but ...: I would space them apart by at least 1 hour so take the Pepcid (famotidine) 1st and if necessary, take the liquid antacid one hour later.
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A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Donald Colantino
60 years experience Internal Medicine
Gerd: These medications have differing mechanisms of action and usually it's not necessary to take them together although I don't think it is harmful to do ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu answered
56 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Need to see doctor: If you need all these medications, you need to consult a gastroenterologist.
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
No: Tums is basically just a calcium pill while Pepcid (famotidine) is an acid blocker.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu answered
56 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Yes: But if your symptoms are severe enough, it would be a good idea to consult a gastroenterologist. Both drugs do the same thing in suppressing acid an ... Read More
A 65-year-old female asked:
Dr. Edgar Mendizabal
54 years experience Internal Medicine
Yes: no problem
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
Yes: Yes they can.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Chiu
Dr. John Chiu answered
56 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Yes: As long as you need both to control your symptoms. However you should consult your doctor if you do require both drugs regularly to control your sympt ... Read More
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A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bruce Jacobs
Specializes in Family Medicine
Maalox or mylanta: may work faster than rolaids or tums, (calcium carbonate)but other that little difference
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
Yes: These can work together to relieve symptoms of stomach acidity, esophageal reflux and gerd. They do not interfere with the action of each other.
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Vivek Huilgol
34 years experience Gastroenterology
Not necessary: These drugs are in the same class and usually are not taken together...
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A 12-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ayisha Gani
Specializes in Internal Medicine
Side effect: Zantac (ranitidine) probably not causing the gas, tums or gas meds can be taken with zantac (ranitidine). Excessive gas may be from malabsorption of t ... Read More
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A 37-year-old female asked:
Dr. Charles Cattano
38 years experience Gastroenterology
Each has relative...: ...merits based on duration of action, side effects, tolerance, cost/insurance coverage. All are equally efficacious, so your question should be bett ... Read More
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sanjay Jain
33 years experience Internal Medicine
Yes: If you need to, but usually one or the other is all you need. If it is not working, make appointment with a gastroenterologist.
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A 42-year-old female asked:
Dr. Arold Augustin
31 years experience Internal Medicine
Drug interaction: You certainly can. However, it is possible that, taken too closely, the absorption of Pepcid (famotidine) might be decreased. So, space the dosing int ... Read More
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A 42-year-old female asked:
Dr. David Ziring
21 years experience Pediatric Gastroenterology
Sure: Why not? Just remember to chew only the Tums (calcium carbonate).
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hashmat Rajput
38 years experience Internal Medicine
You can, if: Usually it is one or the other. However you can use both if you have severe gerd or peptic ulcer disease, because of their different modes of action. ... Read More
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A member asked:
Dr. David Ziring
21 years experience Pediatric Gastroenterology
Yes, but they work: differently and need to be taken during different times of the day. Omeprazole needs to be taken before breakfast, and Zantac (ranitidine) after dinn ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mahmoud Shoib
12 years experience Internal Medicine
If caused by acid: If its caused by extra acid in your stomach then it can help.

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