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pontocaine

A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Mackinnon
32 years experience in Anesthesiology
Harder to find: Pontocaine, or chloroprocaine, is an ester based local anesthetic with rapid onset and offset. It is relatively safe but do to its extremely rapid me ... Read More

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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Henning
49 years experience in Anesthesiology
Yes: Pontocaine is a topical local anesthetic and, if used as indicated, should be effective.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Qamar Khan
16 years experience in Pain Management
Local Pharmacy: Pontocaine is just a brand name for tetracaine. Tetracaine can be found over the counter in lower concentrations in many anesthetic creams/ointments ... Read More
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Susan Nicolson
Specializes in Anesthesiology
Local Anesthetic: Allegy to local anesthetic pontocaine (tetracaine). Pontocaine is one of the ester anesthetics. Allegic finding can include any or all of the follow ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alexander Bankov
36 years experience in Anesthesiology
Two different meds: If I understood your question correctly, lidocaine (an amide) is also a local anesthetic, yet chemically it is different from tetracaine (an ester). ... Read More
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Karen Sibert
38 years experience in Anesthesiology
Similar: All of these are topical anesthetics, meaning that they can be applied directly to skin or mucous membranes to treat minor pain such as teething or sc ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Engel
38 years experience in Dentistry
Yes: I say yes because it is not a rare type of anesthetic. It is usually of shorter duration than lidocaine. In my office I use a carobaine plain for th ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Karen Sibert
38 years experience in Anesthesiology
Similar: All of these are topical anesthetics, meaning that they can be applied directly to skin or mucous membranes to treat minor pain such as teething or sc ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Jenkins
Specializes in Anesthesiology
Yes: Emla (lidocaine and prilocaine) can prevent or greatly reduce the pain for a needle injection.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Orrin Ailloni-Charas
28 years experience in Anesthesiology
For what?: Elma is a topical local anesthetic that aids in reducing the pain of IV placement.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Brian Nichol
29 years experience in Anesthesiology
Local anesthesia: Lidocaine and tetracaine are local anesthetics; each is a distinct molecule.
A 48-year-old male asked:
Dr. Rodney Del Valle
35 years experience in Anesthesiology
It's an amino: Amide local anesthetic used in dentistry. As an anesthesiologist i don't use it except in a combination with Lidocaine in the form of a cream. The cre ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Jenkins
Specializes in Anesthesiology
Normally the: difference in different local anesthetics is duration of action and possibly cardiac toxicity. But an important difference between prilocaine and Benz ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Romanth Waghmarae
38 years experience in Pain Management
Lidocaine septocaine: Both are local anesthetics and are used to block nerves.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
39 years experience in Dentistry
With Lidocaine..: .... You're not asleep, you're just numb. With a general anesthetic, you're asleep.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Karen Sibert
38 years experience in Anesthesiology
Similar: All of these are topical anesthetics, meaning that they can be applied directly to skin or mucous membranes to treat minor pain such as teething or sc ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Rosenfeld
26 years experience in Pain Management
It can: Topical analgesia with Emla (lidocaine and prilocaine) can help reduce the pain of any injection.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Einar Ottestad
18 years experience in Pain Management
Anesthetic: Emla (lidocaine and prilocaine) is a mixture of Lidocaine and prilocaine, two local anesthetics, used for skin anesthesia prior to procedures like IV ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Newton
18 years experience in Pain Management
Lidocaine: This is a topical anesthetic that normally is used to numb up the skin prior to a procedure. Or injection. Often used in children who may need to hav ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shabbir Hossain
15 years experience in Internal Medicine
Topical anesthetic: Emla (lidocaine and prilocaine) is a topical anesthetic and can help with injection site pain. It won't take all the pain away, but it can help. Talk ... Read More
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A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Kaplan
41 years experience in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Neither: Will resolve an abscess. Abscesses need to be surgically drained in the office or operating room depending on the size location and your surgeon.
A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
35 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
With : Intravenous line, also called angiocath or heplock. Pretty much the standard.
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Rosenfeld
26 years experience in Pain Management
Numb skin: Administration of topical anesthetics to control pain associated with procedures such as laceration repair may avoid the need for infiltrative local a ... Read More

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