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oxygen saturation levels while sleeping

A 66-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience in Neurology
My reaction: Advise you to sit down with your doctor and go over both studies in full detail, as one of these is clearly WRONG. Although I would favor a clinic ou ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hesham Hassaballa
21 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Above 90%: Normally, oxygen saturation should stay above 90% during sleep.
A 59-year-old member asked:
Dr. Aaron Milstone
26 years experience in Pulmonology
Yes: Your oxygen level when you sleep should be above 88%. Anything lower than this can increase your risk of irregular heart beat, myocardial infarction ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ranji Varghese
16 years experience in Sleep Medicine
It all depends: Without knowing a detailed medical history to determine if "low" oxygen may be a chronic, well compensated issue, it is impossible to answer. Typical ... Read More
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10 thanks
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sanjay Agarwal
25 years experience in Pulmonology
No: In general, it does not. If it happens in your case, please seek help.
A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gregg Vagner
23 years experience in Hand Surgery
Close to 100: The closer to 100, the better. Most consider optimal above 92.
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1 thank
A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. William Walsh
16 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Varies: If the heart is still beating and the patients lungs haven't filled with edema, the saturation s can be normal near the heart... But if there is no fo ... Read More
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A 24-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dariush Saghafi
32 years experience in Neurology
Right on the brink: Typically, O2 sats while asleep in a healthy individual should be >90. If yours are typically hitting 90 or below then, I'd say you are right in th ... Read More
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1 thank
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Klaus d Lessnau
35 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Monitor: There are many continuous so2 devices to monitor oxygen during the night. Even on the iphone. Check them out and discuss with your lung doc asap.
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A 71-year-old male asked:
Dr. Rashed Hasan
30 years experience in Pediatrics
Sleep apnea: One of the features of sleep apnea is that the oxygen level and hemoglobin-oxygen saturation (the amount of oxygen carried in the blood to the tissues ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience in Pediatrics
It happends: Bronchiolitis causes a build up of secretions in the tiny airways and blocks transfer of oxygen into the tissues. It can and does cause a drop in bloo ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Donald Jacobson
39 years experience in Psychiatry
Sleep O2 deprivation: The symptoms vary from mild sleepiness to difficulty concentrating and adhd, anxiety, panic, depression, severe sleepiness, irritability, and mild cog ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlo Hatem
24 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
It can: Sepsis can cause acute inflammation and swelling in the lungs making it harder to breathe, and causing oxygen levels to drop. Compromised heart and ki ... Read More
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A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Carlo Hatem
24 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Low blood oxygen: At the advanced stages of copd, the lungs do not perform their function well, oxygen has a harder time crossing into the blood stream. At this point, ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rada Ivanov
30 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Yes: Sepsis can cause acute lung injury (ali) and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) which are both reactions of the lung to the toxins and cytokin ... Read More
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Seema Khosla
21 years experience in Sleep Medicine
Have a sleep study: This may be due to obstructive sleep apnea. If you have documented low oxygen levels at night, see your doctor. You may also have a lung disease or ca ... Read More
A 65-year-old female asked:
Dr. Stephen Southard
14 years experience in Internal Medicine
No: Just the electrical activity/conduction of the heart.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Azmat Qayyum
32 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Yes: People with different conditions can have normal oxygen saturation but could have difficulty breathing . Asthma. Copd. Pulmonary. Embolism etc.
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Edward Goldberg
Specializes in Gastroenterology
Breath rate increase: O2 deprivation will typically cause people to breath faster. Abg measures levels of oxygen, carbon dioxide and blood ph. Faster breathing causes a dro ... Read More
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A 40-year-old female asked:
Dr. Rashed Hasan
30 years experience in Pediatrics
OSA: snoring by itself my not cause a drop in oxygen saturation, however, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or hypopnea/hypoventilation can. If there are conce ... Read More
A 38-year-old female asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
Yes.: Don't really have any choice. Not sure why your levels are low or how low, but staying awake eternally is not an option. If low levels are due to a ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alexander Bankov
36 years experience in Anesthesiology
Not quite: Oxygen saturation reflects the proportion of red blood cell pigment - hemoglobin that is loaded ("saturated") with oxygen. It is unitless and shown as ... Read More
1
1 thank

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