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A 50-year-old member asked:

Is an oxygen saturation of 69% when sleeping dangerously low?

2 doctor answers2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Aaron Milstone
Pulmonology 28 years experience
Yes: Your oxygen level when you sleep should be above 88%. Anything lower than this can increase your risk of irregular heart beat, myocardial infarction (heart attack) and stroke. Most low oxygen levels during sleep are due to obstructive sleep apnea but if you have lung disease your oxygen level can go low at night as well. A sleep study and breathing test should be done on you.
Dr. Robert Ryan
Dentistry 51 years experience
Yes: 69% saturation is quite low. Does the patient stop breathing at night (sleep apnea)? Do they have copd? Asthma or other lung disease? These questions need to be answered. The primary care physician should be consulted and a sleep study ordered.

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A 41-year-old member asked:

What is oxygen saturation (spo2) while sleeping that is dangerously low?

1 doctor answer2 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ranji Varghese
Sleep Medicine 18 years experience
It all depends: Without knowing a detailed medical history to determine if "low" oxygen may be a chronic, well compensated issue, it is impossible to answer. Typically normal oxygen staurations are within 94-97% while sleeping. Patients with sleep breathing disorders, like sleep apnea may experience dips in this saturation. However, it is standard to try and keep saturation above 89%. Talk to your doctor.

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Last updated Oct 26, 2018

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