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nausea after massage therapy

A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Craig Morton
18 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
See below: If you want a massage I would go to a licensed massage therapist.

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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Danny Proffitt
43 years experience Family Medicine
Could!: Massage therapy is very good at getting one relaxed. Tense muscles could tend to lead to strain and pain and thus inhibit recovery. It certainly cou ... Read More
2
2 thanks
Dr. Joseph Newman
32 years experience Podiatry
It can: It can decrease pain, increase circulation, decrease muscle spasm, increase muscle flexibility, and improve overall mobility. It has a number of appli ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Eitner
34 years experience Family Medicine
Improved Performance: Sports massage therapy benefits both the mind and the body. Benefits include increased blood flow, range of motion, flexibility, and elimination of e ... Read More
2
2 thanks
Dr. Thomas Namey
48 years experience Rheumatology
Loosening tight musc: It. Loosens tight muscles, aids with spasm, relaxes you, etc. Muscles glide on fascia, a slippery connective tissue, which also can become irritated ... Read More
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1 thank
Dr. Frank Holmes
23 years experience Sports Medicine
Muscle relaxation: A massage can relieve muscle tightness and tension. Some believe it helps them reduce soreness and improve recovery. Benefits vary from person to pers ... Read More
A 32-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ray Holt
Dr. Ray Holt answered
28 years experience Family Medicine
2 different rehabs: Massage does just that, massages sore tight muscles. Whereas physical therapy stretches and strengthens muscles and joints.
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gregory Billy
28 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Accupressure: Accupressure therapies focus on reducing muscle pain secondary to knots. Range of motion exercises then address underlying tightness that can lead to ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Eitner
34 years experience Family Medicine
Yes, unless...: In most people, massage and stretching can improve the flexibility of any joint in the body. If there is an abnormality or disease process that inter ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 49-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Killian
28 years experience General Practice
Erection: Wrong Time: Hi any professional massage therapist is very aware of this common occurrence and should handle the situation with dignity. In most instances the m ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
46 years experience Pediatrics
None: There is no evidence scientifically or otherwise that massage therapy helps add/adhd.Anxiety, for example yes, but not add. See a trained doctor for a ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
25 years experience Psychiatry
That depends: That depends on your needs. Yoni can enhance sexuality & help with sexual trauma. Kriya is very eclectic – your needs dictate which of many approaches ... Read More
A 29-year-old member asked:
Dr. Chan Hwang
27 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Many: First, massage increases circulation, allowing therapeutic blood and lymph flow to occur. It relaxes injured and tense muscles. It reduces spasms and ... Read More
3
3 thanks

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