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Mouth breathing

A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Bates
35 years experience in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
No, but...: Mouth breathing isn't dangerous by itself, but it is abnormal and usually reflects a problem somewhere else in the airway. Nasal breathing is normal, ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Ruden
37 years experience in Dentistry
Many options: Mouth breathing treatment options are numerous. Depending on the current clinical picture and symptoms, the effective treatment for mouth breathing in ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
53 years experience in Dentistry
Mouth breathing?: What are your concerns? Please be more specific.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Brijesh Chandwani
10 years experience in Pain Management
Humidifier: Mouth breathing can occur mainly due to obstruction in the nasal passages which can be due to structural obstructions, inflammation as well as dry air ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Luis Villaplana
34 years experience in Internal Medicine
YEA: Over time it causes dryness and potential changes in normal bacterial mouth flora.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Green
8 years experience in Dentistry
Sinus problems: I would get a full exam of your sinuses and find out if you can improve your breathing through your nose! perhaps there are allergies that are compli ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 68-year-old male asked:
Dr. William Walsh
16 years experience in Addiction Medicine
COPD or pneumonia : While the list of possibilities is very long, COPD exacerbation, acute pneumonia, or pulmonary fibrosis are at the top of the list. Get evaluated soo ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Apatoff
43 years experience in Dentistry
Absolutely: Mouth breathing can most certainly cause gingivitis! to minimize the gingivitis, first you must have excellent oral hygiene including daily flossing ... Read More
A 37-year-old male asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
53 years experience in Dentistry
Problems: You have quite a number of dental problems and each need to be addressed. When was you last dental exam? You need a one on one comprehensive evaluatio ... Read More
A 49-year-old female asked:
Dr. Greg Sorkin
19 years experience in Emergency Medicine
No simple answer: You list a wide range of symptoms that may or may not be related. You need a comprehensive physical exam and blood and urine testing and probably a ch ... Read More
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A 59-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ann De nardin
21 years experience in Family Medicine
Difficult breathing: Your symptoms could indicate asthma. It could also be a side effect of an ace inhibitor such as lisinopril. If the difficulty breathing is moderate ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steven Koos
20 years experience in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Mouth Breathing: Can be due to many causes actually, such as a skeletal malocclusion or vertical excess with lip incompetence, macroglossia, nasopharyngeal obstruction ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nela Cordero
53 years experience in Pediatrics
MOUTH BREATHING: I dont think mouth breathers damage their teeth. They have dry mouth but then they gargle to get rid of the bacteria
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Charles Kattuah
22 years experience in Dentistry
Cavities & gum probs: Breathing through your mouth dries it out. Saliva is needed to help prevent decay. Saliva is also needed to help fight bacteria that causes gum diseas ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Anna Meyer
18 years experience in Pediatric ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Very likely: If you have difficulty breathing through your nose and snoring, it is very likely that the two are related, though there can be additional causes of t ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mircea Petrina
23 years experience in Cardiology
No!: It can only cause dry mouth!
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jaime Quejada
33 years experience in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Adenoids ; tonsils: Ok? Make sure to have these checked first. Chronic upper airway or sinus congestion needs to be evaluated also, may be allergy-related or chronic infe ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Fisher
31 years experience in Dermatology
Open mouth breathing: Yes, open mouth breathing is a suspected contributing factor to temporomandibular disorders(tmd). The open position can cause strain on the ligaments ... Read More
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A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barbara Stark Baxter
41 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
Nose humidifies more: Your respiratory system is designed with a natural humidifying organ, your nose. When you do not breathe through it, the air bypasses its humidifier a ... Read More
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A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Justin Greiwe
11 years experience in Allergy and Immunology
No: Excess swallowing should not cause these symptoms. Talk with primary doctor about your complaints to determine if something else is causing these symp ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Manolis Manolakakis
20 years experience in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Yes: Typically mouth breathing is a result of nasal obstruction. This could be from a deviated septum, enlarged or hypertrophic turbinates, concha bullosa, ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sandra Eleczko
35 years experience in Dentistry
Mouth breather: Are you a mouth breather? This can make your mouth and throat very dry. Your doctor can evaluate you for sinus blockage, allergies, deviated septum. ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Fernando Juliao
29 years experience in Dentistry
Complex...: Consider eval with md for tonsil and adenoids removal or other medical reasons for mouth-breathing (chronic sinusitis?). Then consider evaluation with ... Read More
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. David Kam
Dr. David Kam answered
35 years experience in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
See your doctor: All your symptoms are unexpected for a 28 years old. You need to see your primary care doctor for a complete work up!
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A 41-year-old male asked:
Dr. Nancy Appelblatt
43 years experience in ENT and Head and Neck Surgery
Yes and no: Most people with dry mouth are actually irritating their lips and tongue without realizing it, given that the tongue has a mind of its own. Is it ok w ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Lederman
39 years experience in Dentistry
No: The purpose of the CPAP (continuous positive air pressure) is to overcome the obstruction to breathing. Mandibular advancement devices (mads) open th ... Read More
A member asked:
Dr. William Walsh
16 years experience in Addiction Medicine
Nonspecific : If you have a sore throat plus shortness of breath, it could be any number of infections. If you can't breath go to your er, but don't drive yoursel ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience in Ophthalmology
Lack of hydration: When you breath in through your nose, the sinus passages and turbulence adds moisture to the inhaled air. Breathing through the mouth is a more direc ... Read More
A 27-year-old female asked:
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
35 years experience in Pain Management
Dry mouth or : Xerostomia. There are many conditions associated with dry mouth and thick saliva or mucus. The most common is xerostomia. The best way to treat dry mo ... Read More
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A 33-year-old female asked:
Dr. Wesley Marquart
17 years experience in General Surgery
Suggests a mass: These symptoms are concerning. You may have a thyroid or other neck mass. Please get evaluated by a primary care doctor.
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Hanul Bhandari
12 years experience in Sleep Medicine
See below: A deviated septum, allergic rhinitis, sleep apnea, among other conditions may cause you to prefer to mouth breathe. It is recommended that you consult ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. SCOTT HARWOOD
44 years experience in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Not usually: No one really knows exactly what "causes" a dry socket. There are basic instructions to follow that will help minimize the chances of developing a dry ... Read More
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
30 years experience in Family Medicine
No risk: If one has fully recovered and has no current heart, lung, or neurological disorders, then one has no future risk related to the electrical shock as a ... Read More
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3 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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Personalized answers
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Talk to a doctor
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