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living at high altitude

A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marybeth Lambe
44 years experience Travel Medicine
Certainly, Examples:: 1.Your bone marrow will makes more oxygen carrying red cells at altitude 2.The body produces more of a particular enzyme which increases release of o ... Read More

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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marybeth Lambe
44 years experience Travel Medicine
Unknown: Studies are in progress. Some illnesses act differently making this tough to gauge. Asthma may be better due to less pollutants up high. Altitude make ... Read More
A 56-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience Cardiology
Not the cause: It's unlikely that altitude is the cause. See this science-based article from the u of hawaii: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/10453102.
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Fisher
31 years experience Dermatology
High altitude: Living at higher altitudes is different than visiting. When you live there, your body has time to completely adjust. When you visit, you need to make ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kevin Considine
29 years experience Family Medicine
Depends on Altitude: Your breathing rate depending on how much higher you go will initially be higher. As one acclimates and gets used to the new higher altitude the rate ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theresa Redling
33 years experience Geriatrics
Low O2: High altitudes can be tough for elders, especially those with lung disease as the available oygen is less. Slow aclimation to high altitudes is vital ... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Wyatt
25 years experience Family Medicine
Closeness: Age of starting college along with the close quarters of dormitories added to the point of being around all new strangers with their own illnesses/ vi ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kevin Considine
29 years experience Family Medicine
Not necessarily: Usually one's breathing and heart rate will be increased initially when moving to a higher altitude. But if one stays more than a few days it should s ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stephen Siegel
37 years experience Pulmonology
No: Pneumothorax is a risk with barotrauma occurring during rapid changes in pressure causing the lung to overexpand. For example if a scuba diver is at ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kenneth Cheng
30 years experience Family Medicine
Close living quarter: It is strongly recommended that all college students living in dorms or frat houses (not just freshman) to get the Meningococcal vaccine due to it bei ... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Wm. Marcus Spurlock
39 years experience Preventive Medicine
Environmental Prob: High industry areas could have issues with higher pollution problems with the air and water. High electrical plants might also cause emf problems for ... Read More
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rodeen Rahbar
19 years experience Vascular Surgery
Yes: There is no evidence the disease would worsen by flying in airplanes.
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. William Scott
38 years experience Pediatric Cardiology
No: Pacemakers are subject to electromagnetic interference, but are not affected by altitude.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Train at: Altitude.
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2 comments
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Justin ORourke
9 years experience Clinical Psychology
Depends on you...: Stress levels are dependent on an interaction between many factors, including level of job risk, level of perceived risk, stress tolerance, personal r ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Doug Hansen
21 years experience Family Medicine
Possibly.: Research has shown that those with a history of joint pain can experience fluctuations in their level of pain with even small shifts in barometric pre ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 30-year-old male asked:
Dr. Joseph Woods
27 years experience Pathology
It depends/little,,,: In this case, it's highly unlikely that anything could happen. You're young, and you live at a high altitude which explains the blood values, at leas ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Freeman
17 years experience Cardiology
Both: At high altitudes, particularly when you first arrive there, it is normal for heart rate and breathing rate to increase. Usually, once acclimated, the ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kalyn Diamond
13 years experience Clinical Psychology
No studies done, but: To my knowledge, there have been no studies done on the effects of antidepressants & altitude. High altitudes can cause symptoms. Some of the 1st sig ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Padmavati Garvey
29 years experience Obstetrics and Gynecology
Yes: Morning sickness is tough enough....Traveling to high altitudes can give you altitude sickness. You will survive but you may not feel so great.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mario Matos-Cruz
38 years experience Thoracic Surgery
How high.: Pulmonary inssuficiency symptoms associated with pectus deformities depends on several factors. Complete pulm.Funct.Test, echocardiogram, cat scan tho ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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