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lazy eye signs

A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali answered
31 years experience Psychiatry
Lazy eye: One eye moves normally in the direction of an object, while the other eye points in, out, up or down.

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A 32-year-old male asked:
Dr. Hamid Sajjadi
39 years experience Ophthalmology
OCT of Optic nerves: If one of the pupils is dilated then it may be an emergency aneurysm. See an ophthalmologist or a neurologist urgently. If not, you need to have an ... Read More
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1 thank
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Non-working = lazy: Lazy eye refers to several issues that can cause the brain to quit accepting input from an affected eye, so it is not working =lazy. Example: 1 eye p ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 30-year-old female asked:
Dr. Oscar Novick
57 years experience Pediatrics
Lazy eye: If not treated a lazy eye can get worse
1
1 thank
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Rx May help: Ambliopia is the process where the brain ignores the "camera" picture from one eye because it is less clear or causes double vision. It can sometimes ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mary Ann Block
31 years experience General Practice
Lack of binocularity: When your 2 eyes don't work together to make one picture, you see double. So your brain stops 1 eye from working so the good eye an see one picture. T ... Read More
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1 comment
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5 thanks
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Noha Ekdawi
15 years experience Ophthalmology
It really depends: It depends on the cause and on age. You need to schedule an appointment with an ophthalmologist nearby.
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12 thanks
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sarah Helfand
36 years experience Pediatrics
Yes.: First of all, it depends on the age of the patient. Possible solutions include glasses, patching, or surgery. Talk to your ophthalmologist (not opto ... Read More
16
16 thanks
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dean Bonsall
26 years experience Pediatric Ophthalmology
Yes: Yes.
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Tim Conrad
33 years experience Ophthalmology
No treatment: There is no effective treatment for a lazy eye in an adult.
1
1 thank

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