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I have a lazy eye should i go to an ophthalmologist or to an optometrist

A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Odette
Ophthalmology 15 years experience
Maybe: If you are under the age of 10 then definitely yes. If your "lazy eye" has vision problems or you wish to have the eye corrected it would be a good i... Read More
Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics 33 years experience
Ophthalmologist: An ophthalmologist can better treat lazy eyes or crooked eyes. A person who may need glasses or contact lenses for nearsightedness, farsightedness, as... Read More
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Depends on age: A lazy eye is one not seeing well usually due to childhood issues which are termed amblyopia. The "lazy" eye, due to poorer central vision turns in o... Read More

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A 20-year-old male asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
Pediatrics 46 years experience
Turning off vision: The brain utilizes the input of both eyes to aid in depth perception/distance etc. As a child grows, their eyes may have different strength, or weakne... Read More
Dr. Tim Conrad
Ophthalmology 34 years experience
Yes: A small percentage of patients with amblyopia will respond to treatment as adults if they have never had treatment. See a pediatric ophthalmologist f... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Salma Elfaki
Pediatrics 21 years experience
Ophthalmologist: If you need any procedure done, the ophthalmologist will be able to take care of it for you and do a more extensive workup.
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Ophthalmologist: Only an ophthalmologist is fully trained to diagnose and treat all eye diseases Optometrist s do well in giving glasses and fitting contacts but can... Read More
A 35-year-old member asked:
Dr. Scott Hamstra
Pediatrics 36 years experience
No: While you can see with both eyes, your brain does not like double vision that comes from an eye that is 'lazy' --- left untreated your brain will 'pre... Read More
A 18-year-old female asked:
Dr. Joseph Bouvier
Pediatrics 25 years experience
See below: Without an exam and further info, it is very difficult to make a diagnosis. There are some disease processes of the eyes that can cause a droopy lid.... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Stephen Hamilton
Ophthalmology 32 years experience
Lazy eye: An eye that cannot see well despite being without disease is called amblyopic or "lazy". There are many causes, most common are strabismus (an eye th... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
Ophthalmology 52 years experience
Look at pictures: A "lazy eye" usually is one in which there is lowered vision and it does not align with the other eye (usually turning out, sometimes in up or down). ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Kira
Ophthalmology 21 years experience
An eye exam: You may feel a problem or see blur in your eye. The only definitive way of identifying a true problem and amblyopia is with a complete eye exam by yo... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Kira
Ophthalmology 21 years experience
It can be: Many cases of amblyopia are due to differences in refraction between the eyes or grossly out of focus eyes. Sometimes, it is caused by farsightedness... Read More
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ali Zaidi
Ophthalmology 16 years experience
No: If you have amblyopia, or lazy eye, then it may mean that you don't have normal vision in that eye. Lasik (or lasek) surgery will not fix that proble... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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