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how to stop a nerve twitch

A female asked:
Dr. Michael Sparacino
36 years experience Family Medicine
Several things: Facial muscles have a tendency for rapid contraction (fasciculation). This is harmless and will go away spontaneously.

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A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Rosenfeld
30 years experience Neurology
Twitching & stress: this symptom is often associated with stress, anxiety, and/or lack of sleep. In the absence of any other symptoms (stiffness, twitching, weakness, s ... Read More
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1 thank
A 19-year-old male asked:
Dr. John Goldman
54 years experience Rheumatology
May be restless leg: You need to see your physician to see if you have restless legs
A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Richard Zimon
58 years experience Internal Medicine
TWITCHING: may be a sign of INNERVATION! (Nerve "coming back") Unfortunately, it can also occur with the ABSENCE of nerve connections! Your Surgeon can order an ... Read More
A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glenn Pomerance
46 years experience Ophthalmology
Irritation: It is not usually the nerve that twitches, it's the muscle. The eyelid is a sandwich made up of skin, muscle, cartilage and lubricating glands. When t ... Read More
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3 thanks
A 28-year-old male asked:
Dr. Bennett Machanic
51 years experience Neurology
Depends on cause: Note that you describe "epileptic seizures", and you take Dilantin (which is an old-fashioned drug used for about 80 yrs). You may be having myocloni ... Read More
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1 thank
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
Called myokymia: Twitching of the lid is common in the middle years. It is random and not precipitated by any known pathology. Mostly it is subtle and you can feel i ... Read More
A 35-year-old female asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Nerve dose twitch : Muscle twitches are caused by our muscles tightening up involuntarily in other words when we're not actually controlling them muscle twitches can ha ... Read More
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1 thank
A 43-year-old female asked:
Dr. Kay Nelson
Specializes in Family Medicine
Neuro problem: It sounds like what we call vasiculations. This is likely a neuromuscular disorder and could be serious. Please see a neurologist ASAP.
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1 thank
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ilan Cohen
24 years experience Ophthalmology
Myokymia: This is usually caused by stress, lack of sleep and excess caffeine. Try eliminating those variables.

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