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how long for danger without anti rejection meds

A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Barry Browne
35 years experience General Surgery
Safer than Rejection: All medicines have side effects. It's the job of the transplant clinic to find the right cocktail for each patient which will prevent rejection with m ... Read More
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2 thanks
Dr. Stuart Flechner
46 years experience Urology
Relatively Safe: The anti-rejections medications used today have been taken by patients for 20 years or more. However, they all have side effects of some sort, and the ... Read More
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1 comment

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A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. W. james Chon
25 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Depends: If you miss just one dose of anti-rejection meds, the risk of that precipitating a rejection is likely low. However, it is the repeated non-complianc ... Read More
A 18-year-old female asked:
Dr. Madhu Kandarpa
9 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Depends on medicine: It depends on the medicine. If just on one occasion should be ok. Better to check with your transplant center or transplant coordinator.
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3 thanks
Dr. Dan Fisher
27 years experience Internal Medicine
OK: That should be fine. No doc ever expects you take the meds exactly 24 hours apart. Take them as close to that as you can. A few hours here and there ... Read More
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1 thank
A 30-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ralph Layman
20 years experience Transplant Surgery
Affects your levels: If you drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruits your Prograf levels will be higher. This may cause your surgeon to lower your dose then when you are ... Read More
A 62-year-old female asked:
Dr. Alan Heldman
33 years experience Cardiology
Complex case: It sounds like you have had an organ transplant (kidney?) and a complex medical situation. These little question boxes are not big enough to address t ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 24-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gregory Hale
Specializes in Nephrology and Dialysis
Lifetime medication: You will need to take anti-rejection medications for life, or at least the life of the transplant. The dosages will be reduced some from the initial d ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jason Kline
19 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Hard to say.: Immunosuppression medications are necessary to prevent the body from attacking the transplanted kidney. If the medications are stopped, the body begi ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mario Matos-Cruz
39 years experience Thoracic Surgery
No.: No.
1
1 comment
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Frederick Tibayan
23 years experience Thoracic Surgery
Be careful: Unfortunately, the medicines that keep the transplanted heart working have significant side effects, like renal failure. Your dosages and levels need ... Read More
2
2 thanks

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