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how long does it take for mumps to go away

A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
7-10 days: If you catch mumps, you will probably be ill for 7 - 10 days. May be more if you have complications?
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park answered
49 years experience Pediatrics
7 to 10 days: Parotid swelling, the most common manifestation, subsides within 7 to 10 days. Orchitis (swelling and tenderness of testicle) usually lasts for 3 to ... Read More
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A 29-year-old male asked:
Dr. Oscar Novick
57 years experience Pediatrics
Ten days: Ten to 14 days at the upper limit.
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Mumps incubation?: The incubation period of mumps is 14-18 days, but can range from 14-25 days.
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A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Colton Bradshaw
Specializes in Pediatrics
According to CDC...: According to the centers for disease control, people with mumps are considered most contagious a few days before symptoms occur until 5 days after the ... Read More
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ecaterina Sartina
34 years experience Pediatrics
2-3 weeks: Mumps has an incubation period most commonly of 16-18 days.
A 46-year-old female asked:
Dr. Larry Lutwick
48 years experience Infectious Disease
Not for the virus: There are no approved antivirals for the mumps virus.
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Park
Dr. Jay Park answered
49 years experience Pediatrics
7 to 10 days: Parotid swelling, the most common manifestation, subsides within 7 to 10 days. Orchitis (swelling and tenderness of testicle) usually lasts for 3 to ... Read More
A 51-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Immunity: There is no significant long term effect of having childhood mumps other than immunity. It tends to ba a much harsher illness in adults.
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A 36-year-old female asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience Pediatrics
Comfort care: There is no specific treatment. Your goal is to assure proper fluid intake to avoid dehydration and nutrition to support the kids recovery. As long as ... Read More
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