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How do prions enter the body

A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Bensinger
51 years experience Ophthalmology
By mouth: These abnormal proteins which can lead to brain degeneration are in food containing brain tissue from affected animals. Herds are checked for this so ... Read More

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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Sam Gandy
Dr. Sam Gandy answered
38 years experience Neurology
Cut skin, ingestion: Ingestion by eating or through broken skin is best established but i would not exclude the possibility of spread through mucosal membranes of the eyes ... Read More
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2 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Glusker
46 years experience Neurology
Prion: Prions are proteins that have changed physical conformation, so that the normal function of the protein inside the cells cannot be accomplished. The ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Darren Gitelman
35 years experience Neurology
Unknown and yes: We all have the prion protein in our dna. Its normal function is unknown. Problems occur when something causes this protein to misfold. Misfolded pri ... Read More
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eric Weisman
35 years experience Neurology
Mostly by mouth: Sometimes by bullet or through skin (regular gasoline) Rarely it is inhaled.
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience Infectious Disease
Only if immune: This will only happen if you have previously been immunized and have antibodies to the virus.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Myron Arlen
63 years experience Surgical Oncology
Attempt destruction: The bodys immune system has developed Tcells to recognize foreign and invading cells, that is bacteria and viruses In order to define their presence ... Read More
A 46-year-old male asked:
Dr. Robert Killian
27 years experience General Practice
Physiology: You are asking us a question that would take a whole textbook to answer. This forum is not designed to teach you science or provide you with a whole t ... Read More
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ahmad M Hadied
48 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Please see below: Children and adults who have giardia infection without symptoms usually don't need treatment unless they're likely to spread the parasites. Many peo ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Romanth Waghmarae
38 years experience Pain Management
Wucheria: This is a parasitic filarial nematode (roundworm) spread by a mosquito vector. It finds its way to the lymphatic system.
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dave Burns
45 years experience Dentistry
Lips nose chin: Cold sores (also called fever blisters.) groups of fluid-filled blisters that often erupt around the lips and sometimes under the nose or around the c ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Namey
47 years experience Rheumatology
Protein is...: Broken down by the stomach (acid hydrolysis) and small intestine to its component Amino Acids which are then absorbed as basic components of proteins ... Read More
A 26-year-old female asked:
Dr. David Sneid
40 years experience Endocrinology
Blood stream: Most go through the blood stream. Many act locally or even in the same cell where they are produced, and what's in the blood is just spill over.
A 40-year-old member asked:
Dr. Clarence Grim
56 years experience Endocrinology
Worms gone: Great wikipedia question.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Clarence Grim
56 years experience Endocrinology
Lead in body: Breath it as in leaded gas. Or eat it as in lead paint chips or drink it as in Detroit water.
A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Kass
27 years experience Podiatry
You sweat: For one.....but keep in mind don't leave it up to your body.....drink fluids and rest. Overheating is not good for you....
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Susan Rhoads
37 years experience Family Medicine
Mind over matter: In humans, and to some extent in other mammals) our brains often tell us to do things that our body knows are bad. One of the problems with evolution ... Read More
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pratip Nag
17 years experience Pediatrics
Depends on what kind: Respiratory allergens attach to eosinophils, mast cells or other cells and cause allergy symptoms; oral allergens get absorbed and bind to mast cells ... Read More
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1 thank
A 34-year-old female asked:
Dr. Holly Maes
35 years experience Pediatrics
Formaldehyde/vaccine: First, not all vaccines contain formaldehyde. The ones that do have very tiny amounts that the body is able to metabolize. Possibly to your surprise, ... Read More
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1 thank
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. K. Mujib Haque
23 years experience Internal Medicine
CMV: CMV virus spreads through body fluids, blood, saliva, urine, semen and breastfeeding. Can infect many organs including central nervous system, lungs, ... Read More
A female asked:
Dr. Heidi Fowler
24 years experience Psychiatry
Ebola Virus: There is no evidence to suggest that Ebola will become airborne. Ebola is not an airborne virus btwn humans per the World Health Organization: “ What ... Read More
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2 comments
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Randall Rogers
43 years experience Colon and Rectal Surgery
Food route: chew in mouth, stomach mixes and meters out into duodenum and then into small intestine for absorption. The residual makes it into the right part of ... Read More
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
48 years experience Pathology
Severe inflammation: Anthrax causes severe inflammation of the affected organ. In terms of seriousness are infections of skin, GI tract and lung. Anthrax pneumonia has ver ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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