Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

Heart diseases

A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Heart disease: Broad categories, atherosclerotic, degenerative, congenital, hypertensive, valvar, infectious, toxic, inflammatory, neoplastic and some i'm likely ove ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Oswari
23 years experience in Family Medicine
Several: There are those from genetic diseases, structural diseases from diseases such as hypertension, infectious diseases, diseases from one's diet, and even ... Read More
5
5 thanks
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
40 years experience in Internal Medicine
The symptoms of Heart diseases include:: Exercise intolerance, Irregular heartbeat, Chest pain, Rapid heart beat, Chest pressure, Weakness, Fatigue.
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
40 years experience in Internal Medicine
Heart diseases is a risk factor for:: Influenza, Flu & Cold.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience in Cardiology
Several things: Medications, surgery, behavior modifications such as stopping smoking, changes in diet, exercise, reducing stress, the exact medicines, or the type of ... Read More
6
6 thanks
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
40 years experience in Internal Medicine
The risk factors for getting Heart diseases include:: Smoking, High blood pressure, Overweight, Stress, Poor nutrition, Getting no exercise, Diabetes, High cholesterol.
A 36-year-old male asked:
Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge
40 years experience in Internal Medicine
The tests for Heart diseases include:: Electrocardiogram, Tilt table test, Stress test, Echocardiogram, Cardiac catheterization, Electrophysiology study, Pericardiocentesis, Cardiac CT Sc ... Read More
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Bress
49 years experience in Internal Medicine
See below.: In the past rheumatic fever was an important cause of valvular heart disease. Today ageing is a common cause of valvular disease such as aortic stenos ... Read More
A 27-year-old male asked:
Dr. Anthony Filly
25 years experience in Radiology
Not usually: Usually congenital heart disease. CHF is usually used for congestive heart failure.
1
1 thank
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rick Koch
Dr. Rick Koch answered
21 years experience in Cardiology
Anything : You acquired & weren't born with.
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Fisher
31 years experience in Dermatology
Curved nails: Curved fingernails are characterized by the curving down of the tip of the nail. The nail bed is softened and there is a spongy sensation when the nai ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nassir Azimi
22 years experience in Interventional Cardiology
Cholesterol: Cholesterol builds up in the wall of the arteries resulting in progressive narrowing. This process is accelerated by smoking, diabetes, high cholester ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Warren Foster
19 years experience in Cardiac Electrophysiology
Chest pain, breath: The problem with heart disease itself, is that it can result in catastrophic events, such as a heart attack, heart failure, or sudden death, when it's ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Atherosclerosis: Depends on one's personal risks smoking, obesity, hypertension, hyperlipemia, diabetes , family history. Simply, one blocks the feeding coronary ar ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience in Cardiology
Many: Well first of all it depends on the type of heart disease. But common symptoms related to the heart would be chest pain, shortness of breath, passing ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
49 years experience in Internal Medicine
In large part, no.: There are inherited factors that will make a person at high risk for heart disease (atherosclerotic disease). These include abnormal cholesterol profi ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nassir Azimi
22 years experience in Interventional Cardiology
Multiple causes.: Stress, stretch, calcium deposition and degeneration all are factors that lead to disease in heart valves. Recurrent inflammation, rheumatic heart dis ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Albert Pizzo
59 years experience in Family Medicine
Signs of heart dis.: Signs of heart disease can be many. And the signs can be similar to other conditions. Some of the possible warning signs are: chest pain or discomfor ... Read More
8
8 thanks
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Specializes in Pediatric Cardiology
Yes: And can usually cause death by the early teens.
2
2 thanks
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Binford
37 years experience in Thoracic Surgery
Close: The way i define it is that cardiovascular disease refers to the present of plaque (arterial disease) in the arteries of the heart. Ischemic heart di ... Read More
A 53-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mathew Chengot
42 years experience in Cardiology
Cardiac cath: 100% answer is cardiac cath and angiography cta and cardiac MRI also helpful functional assessment is with stress test and per fusion scan.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Continuum: Coronary disease develops from our lifestyle and as we age real blockage develops in some or all coronary vessels. One or more plaques disrupt and ob ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Cardiac markers: Read this: http://en.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/cardiac_marker.
A 25-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Stern
45 years experience in Cardiology
No: No, there is no evidence for that, however, if you have bad gum disease, it is risk factor for cad.( probably from inflammation).
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
26 years experience in Internal Medicine
Yes and no: There are four valves in the heart and a variety of disorders may affect each. Many are benign, but some are progressive and fatal. Specifics will d ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Nikolaos Zacharias
25 years experience in Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Estrogenic effect.: The beneficial effects of ovarian steroids during the reproductive life of women account for their protection from major cardiac events before menopau ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Multiple: Smoking smoking obesity family history asthma hypertension diabetes.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Diamond
45 years experience in Pediatrics
Pay Your Way: Probably the only way is to pay for all the tests yourself.If the doctor bills the insurance you are doomed.
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience in General Surgery
Overlap: Atherosclerosis develops in our coronaries and can cause damage to heart. Some other diseases damage heart as well! viral, rheumatic, infections etc ... Read More
A 34-year-old male asked:
Dr. Cynthia Thaik
30 years experience in Cardiology
Get further testing : Make sure no lymph nodes, arms not swollen, no pulsating vessel. If not probably benign.
1
1 thank
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Pedro Hernandez
39 years experience in Geriatrics
Yes.: Malaria is number one cause in the world of cardiac electric conduction disorders requiring pacemakers.
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
Smoke: Smoking and second hand smoke.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Rada Ivanov
30 years experience in Pulmonary Critical Care
Google it: Rf: smoking, obesity, hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, family history etc. Symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, palpitations etc. You r ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Heart disease: Viruses like hiv, coxsackie and adenovirus; bacteria like staph, strep and ricketssia, and parasites like trypanosomes.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Shabbir Hossain
15 years experience in Internal Medicine
We thought so..: So we knew that oxidative stress is a key factor in cancers and other disease processes. So naturally we thought, lets load patients with antioxidants ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 34-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Leibowitz
27 years experience in Internal Medicine
Sometimes: Some people inherit what are called 'dyslipidemias'- which is a fancy way of saying messed up lipids - that cause coronary disease - but what most pe ... Read More
6
6 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Ferguson
45 years experience in Pediatrics
Flow demands: The fetal heart is required to do about half the work of living outside. Blood from the body is pumped through the heart back to the body & placenta ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ravinder Rustagi
45 years experience in Internal Medicine
Yes: To be more precise it can be any kind of angina
A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience in Cardiology
Yes: There are several classes of drugs to lower lipids. The most commonly used are called statins and they lower the bad cholesterol. Other drugs, called ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
55 years experience in Infectious Disease
Rheumatic fever : People who get acute rheumatic fever secondary to streptococcal pharyngitis are the recipients of rheumatic heart disease. During ARF patients get pa ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 29-year-old female asked:
Dr. Sarkis Barupian
39 years experience in Family Medicine
Serious and manageab: Congestive heart failure is often one of the compications of CAD. Both are serious conditions that can be managed with proper medications, diet, exerc ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 62-year-old member asked:
Dr. Martin Bress
49 years experience in Internal Medicine
Medically: Medical treatment is the most important. Drugs to lower cholesterol and treat elevated blood pressure are essential. Aspirin and other anti-clotting d ... Read More
3
3 thanks
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Thomas Namey
47 years experience in Rheumatology
Yes.: Crestor (rosuvastatin) has been shown to slow plaque buildup in arteries, or in some instances regression. It has been proven to reduce both the like ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Fenster
30 years experience in Cardiology
Depends: It depends on the cause and if there are any symptoms from the bradycardia. Many athletes have a resting bradycardia. This reflects their excellent co ... Read More
2
2 thanks
A 26-year-old male asked:
Dr. Randy Baker
39 years experience in Holistic Medicine
Holistic approach: There are many types of heart disease. If you're talking about cardiovascular disease dean ornish md proved it can be reversed with diet, exercise & s ... Read More
2
2 comments
A 44-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mircea Petrina
23 years experience in Cardiology
Wrong: Chronic inflammation causes heart disease.
1
1 thank
A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Quang Nguyen
Specializes in Endocrinology
No: Whether you believe the data or not, I do not recommend using rosiglitazone in patients with heart disease. There are many other alternatives for thi ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience in Cardiology
Hypertension: We treat hypertension with medications to prevent heart disease. Some medications can cause elevated blood sugar.
A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Vogt Lowell
Specializes in Pediatric Cardiology
Some of it: Even though 8 out of every 1000 babies born will have have some form of heart defect, when there is a first line family member affected the number goe ... Read More
8
8 thanks
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. David Miller
9 years experience in Family Medicine
Sometimes: Having a parent or sibling with heart disease can represent an inheritable heart disease not all family risk is the same, though. Men younger than 5 ... Read More
A 34-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Rasak
32 years experience in Cardiology
Postmenopausal: Postmenopausal.
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Szawaluk
30 years experience in Cardiology
See below: Adhere to a healthy low fat diet, avoid smoking, get plenty of exercise, treat high blood pressure , high cholesterol and diabetes if appropriate. Kno ... Read More
A 28-year-old female asked:
Dr. Bernard Seif
39 years experience in Clinical Psychology
It is good to keep: family history in mind but most people have relatives who have had cardiac problems. Lifestyle is a major factor. After your doc has ruled out any m ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
Unlimited visits
$10/month