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Foley catheter

A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Glenn Messina
34 years experience in Aesthetic Medicine
Steps: Deflate the balloon gently pull forward and out no tugging make sure the balloon is really deflated

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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bryan Treacy
34 years experience in Gynecology
Drainage: Make sure the catheter is not kinked, is draining appropriately & take a prophylactic antibiotic if the catheter is in for any significant period of t ... Read More
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ramsay Kuo
25 years experience in Urology
No: A Malecot catheter is more typically used to drain the kidney via a passage through the back or the bladder through a suprapubic passage. It has soft ... Read More
A 47-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gebrehana Zebro (formerly Woldegiorgis)
31 years experience in Internal Medicine
There is no clear: Cut answer for it . The principle is that it has to come out if it is not absolutely necessary
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Raphael Peralta
Specializes in Family Medicine
Helps to pee: A tube to help pee.
A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Klauber
Specializes in Pediatric Urology
Bladder or urethral: Infection because germs travel up alongside or through the catheter. Hence we always try to remove Foley catheters as soon as possible, or even to try ... Read More
A 59-year-old female asked:
Dr. Vicken Poochikian
41 years experience in Internal Medicine
Need more Info: At your age its difficult to comprehend your question. Foley catheters are a major cause of bladder and kidney infections. Be careful.
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. John Nesbitt
40 years experience in Urology
Different things: A Foley catheter is a plastic or latex tube inserted into the bladder to drain urine from it. A colposcope is an instrument used to visualize the cerv ... Read More
A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steve Kagan
30 years experience in Vascular Surgery
Not usually: Esrd patients usually have no urine output but some patients do still produce some urine...It depends on the patient.
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Yu
25 years experience in Urology
Not usually: Traumatic catheterization can cause hematuria (bloody urine), but this is not common.
A 54-year-old female asked:
Dr. Oscar Novick
57 years experience in Pediatrics
No relation: Not at all, unless there are complication from the surgery.
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A 45-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bryan Treacy
34 years experience in Gynecology
Probably not: For short term use, the Foley catheter should not cause detrusor muscle trouble.
A 67-year-old male asked:
Dr. James Fishman
33 years experience in Urology
Meatitis or UTI: First thing is to have your urine tested for any bacterial uti, especially after having a recent catheter. You can also have inflammation at the penil ... Read More
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A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Stern
45 years experience in Cardiology
Groin or wrist : Groin or wrist arteries.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Roscoe Nelson
27 years experience in Urology
What is question?: Cath in bladder, filled with contrast, urinate and get x-rays. Can show reflux and urethral abnormalities.
A 100-year-old member asked:
Dr. Larry Lutwick
48 years experience in Infectious Disease
Depends...: But, unless the patient is on antimicrobials, putting a Foley catheter in a patient with n active, untreated UTI can cause sepsis.
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jeffrey Ramkaransingh
19 years experience in Interventional Radiology
Every 3-6 months: If your g tube is functioning properly every 6 months is fine. If you've had problems with clogging, 3 months is better.
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Robert Harris
30 years experience in Urogynecology
Yes: D not remove the catheter without deflating the balloon as this could damage your urethra (the tube that drains your bladder). The balloon can be defl ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Simon Kimm
15 years experience in Urology
Very briefly.: An indwelling ureteral stent is removed in one of two ways. A quick pull on a little string to pull it out of the urethra, or by using a flexible scop ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Douglas Lawson
27 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Catheter trauma: As the Foley goes thru the urethra and into the bladder it can cause abrasions, leading to bleeding and clotting sometimes. However, if it is being i ... Read More
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A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Simon Kimm
15 years experience in Urology
Very briefly.: An indwelling ureteral stent is removed in one of two ways. A quick pull on a little string to pull it out of the urethra, or by using a flexible scop ... Read More
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1 comment
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Raj Singh
Dr. Raj Singh answered
10 years experience in Internal Medicine
Through urethra: Genital area and tip of urethra is disinfected and urethral tract anesthetized by Lidocaine or another local anesthetic. Urinary catheter is than slow ... Read More
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Bennett Werner
43 years experience in Cardiology
Yes: Catheter ablation is considered a first line therapy for symptomatic WPW syndrome. It's highly effective in the majority of cases. It's generally safe ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Rasak
32 years experience in Cardiology
Helps pts urinate: Its a catheter inserted thru the urethra into the blader. Its used to collect urine for testing, for obstructions in pts who can't otherwise urinate, ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Daniel Lee
19 years experience in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Yes its common: It's common to have Foley catheter inserted during a vaginal hysterectomy to keep your bladder empty during the surgery.
A 55-year-old member asked:
Dr. Milton Mintz
66 years experience in Geriatrics
Producing urine?: Get to urologist as soon as possible.
A 35-year-old male asked:
Dr. Lane Childs
33 years experience in Urology
2 weeks: The question is not very clear, however assuming you had transurethral surgery to help remove a catheter it may take you a couple of weeks to feel bet ... Read More
A 72-year-old male asked:
Dr. James Lin
Dr. James Lin answered
50 years experience in Urology
Here are some ...: Yes, some hurt on pulling a deflated Foley's is expected, but highly tolerable under adjusting expectation and skillful execution. Just close your eye ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. George Klauber
Specializes in Pediatric Urology
Use 2% lidocaine gel: Into the urethral meatus, then have subject breath deeply in and out and pass the catheter slowly. Good luck.
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1 thank

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

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Personalized answers
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