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Effects of sugar on the teeth

A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Sugar doesn't rot: It is the acid produced from the bacteria in your mouth that eat the sugar that causes decay. Sugar is like rocket fuel to the bacteria, and the more ... Read More

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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Sugar doesn't rot: It is the acid produced from the bacteria in your mouth that eat the sugar that causes decay. Sugar is like rocket fuel to the bacteria, and the more ... Read More
Dr. Felicia Mata
25 years experience Cosmetic Dentistry
The Acid Weaken: The enamel which is the strongest structure in the human body - stronger than bone. It cause pitting and decay. Acid can rot dentin, the second layer ... Read More
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Wright
33 years experience Dentistry
Floss: To keep your teeth as healthy as possible floss after every meal. Ideally you would brush as well. The floss breaks the contact between the teeth and ... Read More
Dr. Ronald Achong
18 years experience Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Floss: The easiest and most effective option is to floss. You can also try a water pik but this is not as effective.
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Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Avoid, floss & rinse: Try to avoid sugars, especially those that are sticky, gooey, and those that adhere to teeth. Most of the time individuals are not even aware of them ... Read More
A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Richard Ruden
38 years experience Dentistry
Bacteria: Once the decay passes through enamel, the dentinal tubules, which have passages to the nerve of the tooth, become exposed, resulting in a toothache. T ... Read More
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A 31-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Saliva: The sugar dissolves in your saliva, and the saliva touches your teeth, so yes, it affects your teeth regardless.
A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Manami Yamaguchi
25 years experience Dentistry
Yes, yes, YES!!: Sugars are consumed by oral bacteria as a quick and easy energy source. Like we eat and go to bathroom afterwards, bacteria need to do the same after ... Read More
A 39-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Not really: When you eat sugary foods, the dissolved sugar starts being digested by the bacteria stuck to your teeth, and they produce acid. Even diluted sugar c ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kraig Stetzer
21 years experience Dentistry
Watch what take in!: Easiest way is to read labels on what you eat and drink. One of the most common causes is sugary drinks. They can do tremendous damage in a short ti ... Read More
A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
Acid: The bacteria that adhere to your teeth produce acid when they come in contact with sugar. It is the acid that irritates the nerve inside of your tooth ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gary Sandler
54 years experience Dentistry
Sugar and teeth: Sugar contributes to tooth decay, but it really depends upon the amount of sugar, how long it is in contact with the tooth and what form it is in. In ... Read More

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