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difference between spastic and flaccid paralysis

A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Dissin
38 years experience Neurology
Amount of tone: The difference between the two is the tone in the limbs. In spastic paralysis the tone is increased, the upper limb is flexed the fingers contracted. ... Read More
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A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Atif Haque
17 years experience Neurosurgery
Spasticity: Both types of paralysis involve loss of voluntary motor function. However, in the spastic type, involuntary movements persist, such as with cerebral p ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Estrada Bernard
37 years experience Neurosurgery
Cord vs root: In general spastic paralysis results from an injury to the spinal cord and flaccid paralysis after an injury downstream from the spinal cord, such as ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michele Arnold
21 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Infections: The cdc (center for disease control) tracks flaccid paralysis, since many cases are related to infections. Viral influenza and the mononucleosis viru ... Read More
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Rosenfeld
31 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Tone: The difference is in the tone of the muscles. In people with spastic paralysis, they will often have involuntary movements of their legs or arms and i ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. James Goodrich
38 years experience Neurosurgery
Rigidity: Spasticity is the a hyperactive hand or arm when their is decreased ability to control the movement of the extremity and rigidity is a situation where ... Read More
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kathryn Mosher
19 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Terminology: Spastic diplegia refers to spasticity that primarily affects the legs, and spastic hemiplegia primarily affects one side of the body (arm and leg). Ce ... Read More
A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Mark Weston
30 years experience Orthopedic Spine Surgery
Neuro vs muscular: To me spasm is a local muscle involuntary contraction and spasticty is a neurologic problem loss of cortical control of motor function causing inabili ... Read More
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A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Marcel Hungs
25 years experience Neurology
Narcolepsy?: Regular sleep paralysis is common in the general population, but hallucinations are often see with sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Johanna Fricke
49 years experience Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Categorical : "cp" is a group of chronic motor impairments defined by functional limitations in mobility & hand use from neurological dysfunction, not by underlying ... Read More
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A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Eran Kessous
21 years experience Sports Medicine
Muscle tone: Hypotonia is related to a muscle being too "relaxed" and spacticity means that a muscle is too "tight" and spasmodic. After a spinal cord injury th ... Read More
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A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Larry Maturani
23 years experience Hospital-based practice
Involuntary movement: Dystonia is an involuntary muscle contraction, repetitive twisting, posturing whereas spasm is also sudden involuntary contraction of muscle groups. G ... Read More
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A 52-year-old member asked:
Dr. Christopher Wilson
20 years experience Sleep Medicine
RLS vs PLMD: Restless legs syndrome is something you feel or experience while you're awake. Periodic limb movements of sleep are brief involuntary muscle contracti ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Darren Gitelman
35 years experience Neurology
Different types: Supranuclear refers to loss of function due to a lack of high level cerebral control of a cranial nerve. E.G., in supranuclear gaze paresis there is d ... Read More
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Rosenfeld
31 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
See below: It is mostly the quality of the movement. With rigidity, the muscle tone stays pretty much the same when someone moves the limb, there is constant res ... Read More
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A 44-year-old member asked:
Dr. Felix Brizuela
31 years experience Neurology
One is more serious: Classic lockjaw is caused by a toxin produced by the tetanus bacteria that causes muscles to go into uncontrollable, involuntary spasms including the ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Peter Kurzweil
49 years experience Internal Medicine
A matter of degree: Hypokalemia leads to weak muscles, when severe enough of chronic enough, paralysis of muscles can occur. There are diseases whose hallmark is hypokal ... Read More
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A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jay Rosenfeld
31 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
See below: Quadriplegia=weakness or paralysis of all 4 limbs. Paraplegia= weakness or paralysis of the 2 lower extremities.
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Lauren Elson
15 years experience Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
4 vs 2: Quadriplegia means that all four of a person's limbs are not functioning at full capacity, whereas in hemiplegia, only two are affected.
A 59-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Bolesta
39 years experience Orthopedic Surgery
Arm function: Paraplegia is paralysis of the legs (no movement or feeling). Tetraplegia (quadriplegia is an older term) is paralysis of the arms and the legs. In bo ... Read More
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A 31-year-old female asked:
Dr. Eric Farbman
25 years experience Neurology
Stiffness & movement: In a parkinson disease (pd) patient, these two conditions are related. Dystonia is a sustained muscle contraction with twisting. Dyskinesia is an invo ... Read More
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Andrew Dutka
44 years experience Neurology
Voluntary movement: Dyskinesia is a general term for involuntary movements. The most common reason is the side effect of medications for Parkinson's disease, but there a ... Read More
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4 thanks

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