Top answers from doctors based on your search:
Disclaimer

could excess iron levels be causing my tooth decay

A 33-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jack Mutnick
17 years experience Allergy and Immunology
Yes: Get into your dentist and disk treatment and preventive options.
Dr. Simon Rosenberg
46 years experience Dentistry
Not Likely: Unless you are sucking on a sugar based source of iron, iron supplements are generally swallowed and not a source of increased decay. If you have dry ... Read More
Dr. Gregori Kurtzman
35 years experience Dentistry
Iron and teeth: Excessive iron in the body does not lead to increased decay. We can see discoloration occur when iron levels are high in young children as the iron i ... Read More
3
3 thanks

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits
$15 per month
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. John DeWolf
40 years experience Dentistry
Interesting: Phytic acid is both an anti-nutrient in that it binds dietary sources of iron very efficiently as well as zinc, calcium and magnesium. It is also cons ... Read More
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
36 years experience Pain Management
Pseudoscience: There are lots of anecdotal stories, but there are no extensive studies or evidence that show that phytic acid will create mineral deficiencies and ca ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 21-year-old female asked:
Dr. Martin Raff
56 years experience Infectious Disease
Iron supplements: Some medications can encourage tooth decay either because they cause xerostomia or are acidic. These include chewable Vitamin C tablets, frequent use ... Read More
1
1 thank
Dr. Jeffrey Bassman
45 years experience Dentistry
Not normally but...: I would think that not in normal circumstances, but I would research and also see a dentist. If you are getting a lot of cavities, you may have other ... Read More
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin answered
36 years experience Pain Management
No.: Tooth decay is a common, preventable problem caused caused by specific types of bacteria. No, iron supplements do not promote or cause tooth decay.
1
1 comment
A 52-year-old female asked:
Dr. Gary Klugman
46 years experience Dentistry
Possibilities: It could make you more susceptible to gums disease. It shouldn't affect your teeth unless something you are taking is causing dry mouth. Things that c ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 4-year-old female asked:
Dr. Theodore Davantzis
40 years experience Dentistry
You've nailed it..: Obstructive sleep apnea (osa) and gerd can be contributing factors to the problem. A dry mouth, together with caustic stomach acid, can wreak havoc to ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 38-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dan Fisher
27 years experience Internal Medicine
Prolonged infection: Prolonged infections can lead to serious systemic infection when bacteria travels from the initial location to another location. That other location ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Kiyan Mehdizadeh
9 years experience Dentistry
Possibly yes: Dry mouth can greatly increase your chance of developing dental decay. If you are an alcoholic, then you experience dry mouth. If you binge drink, the ... Read More
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mazin Kizy
22 years experience Dentistry
Bacteria: Tooth decay is caused by bacteria living in your mouth. The bacteria use carbohydrates (sugars) to produce acids which breakdown the surface of the t ... Read More
1
1 thank
A 36-year-old member asked:
Dr. Matthew Hyde
41 years experience Dentistry
No : Never heard of this type of reaction.
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Abraham Jaskiel
22 years experience Dentistry
Tea and decay: It depends on the sugar and acid content of the tea, also extreme temperatures cause expansion and contraction that can cause small fractures that can ... Read More

90,000 U.S. doctors in 147 specialties are here to answer your questions or offer you advice, prescriptions, and more. Get help now:

Ask doctors free
Personalized answers
Free
Talk to a doctor
24/7 visits
$15 per month