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congestive heart failure and renal failure and uti

A 50-year-old member asked:
Dr. Elden Rand
20 years experience Cardiology
Variable: All 94yo patients have a high overall mortality rate. Renal failure and congestive heart failure are two conditions which can contribute to a rapid ... Read More
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A 50-year-old male asked:
Dr. Venkata Chilakapati
22 years experience Cardiology
Cardio-renal syndrom: Seems like he is developing cardiorenal syndrome. It should be managed collectively by a cardiologist and nephrologist.
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4 thanks
A 48-year-old male asked:
Dr. Jack Rubin
47 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Brother's problems: If your brother has renal failure and needs to start dialysis, he should go to the nearest er and start it. In the hospital, a social worker probably ... Read More
A 62-year-old female asked:
Dr. Jack Rubin
47 years experience Nephrology and Dialysis
Life expectancy: You ask a difficult question. Stage 4 chronic kidney disease (ckd) is far advanced stage of ckd. The life expectancy (l) of a 96 year old female in th ... Read More
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A 41-year-old female asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
Sick: Doesn't sound good what do you want to know?
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Chris Gouveia
8 years experience General Practice
Yes: Heart failure is a colloquial term for the formal "congestive heart failure" diagnosis. The term "congestive" refers to the fact that with heart failu ... Read More
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A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ali Valika
19 years experience Cardiology
Volume status: Congestive identifies somebodey with volume overload. Heart failure may be present without having overt "congestion" currently.
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A 37-year-old member asked:
Dr. Venkata Chilakapati
22 years experience Cardiology
Heart failure: Both are interchangeable terms.
A 54-year-old member asked:
Dr. Keith Stockerl-Goldstein
29 years experience Hematology and Oncology
Yes: These are generally 2 independent problems. Yes, both anemia and congestive heart failure can occur at the same time.
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A 43-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Zevitz
36 years experience Internal medicine
Yes: Heart failure can cause decreased blood flow to the kidneys, causing decreased renal function. Renal failure can also exacerbate heart failure by incr ... Read More
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4 thanks
A 48-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ray Holt
Dr. Ray Holt answered
27 years experience Family Medicine
One canlead to other: Hypertension can cause changes in the heart like overgrowth of the heart muscle or weakening of the muscle through plaque build up in the arteries tha ... Read More
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A 49-year-old member asked:
Dr. Steve Kagan
30 years experience Vascular Surgery
See below: If you have severe heart, liver and kidney failure, your outlook is poor...Sorry!
A 53-year-old member asked:
Dr. Jonathan Leibowitz
27 years experience Internal Medicine
Well - depends!: It all depends on exactly what you asked - how sever is it ? Its never really good - when its severe - well, then i guess you would say its 'severe' a ... Read More
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1 thank
A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Calvin Weisberger
50 years experience Cardiology
CHF: Most CHF is chronic, there is acute CHF but it is often acute on top of chronic.
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A 65-year-old male asked:
Dr. Dominic Riganotti
24 years experience Infectious Disease
Poor: Not good i'm afraid. The cardiac output alone is reaching a point of non-compatibility with life.
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A 46-year-old member asked:
Dr. Mark Avdalovic
24 years experience Pulmonary Critical Care
Closely: Impaired left heart function leads to elevated filling pressure of the left heart and this pressure is transmitted to the right heart creating pulmona ... Read More
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. Creighton Wright
55 years experience General Surgery
Overlap: Atherosclerosis develops in our coronaries and can cause damage to heart. Some other diseases damage heart as well! viral, rheumatic, infections etc ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Gutti Rao
Dr. Gutti Rao answered
45 years experience Hospital-based practice
CHF vs cAD: CHF is the inability of the heart muscle to effectively either contract or dilate the chambers so that blood reaches all parts of the body. This resul ... Read More
A 47-year-old member asked:
Dr. Ronald Krauser
51 years experience Rheumatology
Sometimes: Hypertension and CAD can lead to the reduced capacity of the heart to function which in turn can lead to chf.
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A 56-year-old member asked:
Dr. Michael Kleerekoper
50 years experience Endocrinology
CHF and diabetes: Regrettably this is not an uncommon combination. On the very positive side you doctors - Endocrinologist and Cardiologist - will take good care of you ... Read More
A 41-year-old member asked:
Dr. Louis Grenzer
54 years experience Cardiology
Similar: Congestive heart failure refers to the congestion (fluid buildup) which is seen in the lungs and the legs (swelling) and in the abdomen. (might be swo ... Read More
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5 thanks
A 38-year-old member asked:
Dr. Cosme Manzarbeitia
38 years experience General Surgery
It can: If it causes severe generalized infection (sepsis) and leads to multisystem organ failure from this.
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5 thanks
A 42-year-old member asked:
Dr. Orlando Deffer
Specializes in General Practice
Arrhythmia and CHF : They hold close ties because if you develop uncontrollable arrhythmias it can weaken your heart and you may develop chf.
A 51-year-old member asked:
Dr. LUIS IRIZARRY
27 years experience Family Medicine
CVD CHF: Cvd is a general term to describe a spectrum of condition when arteries cannot provide enough oxygen to tissue (brain, heart, kidney, liver, all your ... Read More

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